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DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED ADDITION OF THE SCIENTIFIC COMPUTATION CERTIFICATE AND REQUEST FOR RECOGNITION ON THE UNIVERSITY TRANSCRIPT

Dean Mary Ann Rankin of the College of Natural Sciences has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the proposed addition of the Certificate in Scientific Computation and the request to recognize it on the university transcript. The change will appear in the in the College of Natural Sciences chapter in the Undergraduate Catalog, 2010-2012. The dean of the college approved the request on March 6, 2009. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation of general interest to the University.

The Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review approved the proposal at its meeting on April 1, 2009, and forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty. The Faculty Council has the authority to approve this legislation on behalf of the General Faculty. The authority to grant final approval on this legislation resides with the executive vice chancellor for academic affairs with notification to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board1.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If an objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Faculty by noon on April 27, 2009.


Greninger Signature
Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The Faculty Council


This legislation was posted on the Faculty Council web site on April 13, 2009.


1 Amended on April 22, 2009.

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PROPOSED ADDITION OF THE SCIENTIFIC COMPUTATION CERTIFICATE AND REQUEST FOR RECOGNITION ON THE UNIVERSITY TRANSCRIPT

CERTIFICATE NAME (Official name as it will appear on the University transcript): Certificate in Scientific Computation

ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT AWARDING THE CERTIFICATE: Division of Statistics and Scientific Computation

STATEMENT OF OBJECTIVE:
As computers grow more and more powerful and modern technologies produce volumes of data, progress in science, medicine, technology, and society requires professionals trained to develop, apply, and understand advanced computational methods. Scientific computation is the use of mathematical, statistical, and computer-based techniques to investigate complex systems in science, engineering, economics, medicine, sociology, and many other disciplines. This certificate program has been designed to complement diverse degree plans across UT and provide students with invaluable training for professions in which advanced computation is fueling progress. It will make them more competitive for jobs in industry and top-tier medical and graduate schools.

This addition will appear in the natural sciences chapter of the Undergraduate Catalog on page 486.

NEED (EXPECTED DEMAND): Twenty students are expected to enroll each year.

COMPLETION REQUIREMENTS: 18 hours.

ACADEMIC COURSE AND OTHER REQUIREMENTS:
Students must complete eighteen credit hours and receive a grade of at least C- in each course. M408D or M408M is a prerequisite for the certificate program.
The core requirements are:
1. One course in computer programming (SSC 222). The course consists of 2 semester credit hours (SCH).
2. One course in Linear Algebra (SSC 329C, M340L, or M341), Discrete Mathematics, or Differential Equations. These courses consist of 3 SCH.
3. Two scientific computation courses (to complete 6 SCH), with one course selected from each of two of the following categories: Numerical Methods, Statistics Methods, and Other Computing Topics.
4. One applied computational science course from an approved list in an area of their choosing. The course will consist of 3 SCH.
5. An independent research project advised by a member of the Division of Statistics and Scientific Computation’s scientific computing faculty as part of a four-hour independent study (SSC 479R). This project requires (1) prior approval by the Certificate Steering Committee and (2) approval of a final write-up of the project by the Certificate Steering Committee. The research project will consist of 4 SCH.


A list of allowable courses for each of these requirements will be available from the division.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM ACADEMIC COMMITTEE (Designate committee chair):
Dr. Lauren Meyers, committee chair, integrative biology and division of statistics & scientific computation, associate professor
Dr. Alan K. Cline, computer sciences, professor
Dr. Todd Arbogast, mathematics, professor
Dr. Mia Markey, biomedical engineering, associate professor
Dr. Elmira Popova, mechanical engineering, associate professor
Dr. David A. Kendrick, economics, professor
Dr. Alexander A. Demkov, physics, associate professor
Dr. Irene M. Gamba, mathematics, professor
Dr. John F. Stanton, chemistry and biochemistry, professor


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GIVE A DETAILED RATIONALE FOR CHANGE(S):
The Undergraduate Certificate in Scientific Computation is the outcome of several years of faculty collaboration to provide undergraduates in a variety of disciplines with invaluable training in the development and application of advanced computational methods. The program takes advantage of existing courses taught on the UT campus and provides a framework for students to carefully select a path of study that will make them more competitive for jobs in industry and top-tier medical and graduate schools. The Division of Statistics and Scientific Computation will provide the administrative home for the program and serve as a centralized unit where associated faculty in scientific computation can collaborate to advise and guide students through the program.

COLLEGE/SCHOOL APPROVAL PROCESS:
Mary Ann Rankin, dean
College of Natural Sciences
Date: March 6, 2009



UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG TEXT
Certificate in Scientific Computation

The Certificate in Scientific Computation offers undergraduate students a plan of study to equip them with the mathematical, statistical, and computer-based tools necessary to investigate complex systems in a variety of applications. It is designed to appeal to students across the University studying science, engineering, economics, medicine, sociology, and many other disciplines. The program includes eighteen hours of coursework. To be admitted into the program, a student must be in good standing in an approved undergraduate degree program and must earn a grade of at least C- in each course required for certification. Students may apply to the program at any point in their undergraduate study. They are encouraged to apply as early as possible so that they can be advised throughout the program.

The certificate program requires eighteen semester hours of coursework as described below; students must also complete Mathematics 408D or 408M as a prerequisite. A list of the approved courses to satisfy each requirement can be found at ssc.utexas.edu or in the Division of Statistics & Scientific Computation in WCH 2.104.

Requirements:
  • One course in computer programming, and one course in either linear algebra, discrete mathematics, or differential equations
  • One course from two of the following three categories – Numerical Methods, Statistics Methods, and Other Computing Topics
  • One applied computing course in an area of the student’s choosing
  • A four-credit independent research project advised by a member of the division’s scientific computing faculty.
Undergraduates who complete the certificate requirements in conjunction with, or within one year after completing the requirements of their degree program, will receive a certificate from the Division of Statistics and Scientific Computation. Receipt of the certificate will be noted on the student’s transcript. A maximum of nine credit hours in the certificate program may be taken after completion of the undergraduate degree. At least half of the required course work in the certificate program must be completed in residence at The University of Texas at Austin.