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IN MEMORIAM

JOHN BENDER LONGENECKER


Dr. John “Jack” Longenecker’s many stellar contributions to The University of Texas at Austin laid the foundation for the establishment of the Department of Nutritional Sciences in 2008. Under his leadership the graduate program in nutritional sciences was established. In addition to his administrative accomplishments, Dr. Longenecker was a nationally respected researcher in nutritional sciences.

John Bender Longenecker was born in Salunga, Pennsylvania, on July 8, 1930, to Earl Bender Longenecker and Florence Way Longenecker. In 1952, he graduated from Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, with a B.A. in chemistry and a minor in mathematics. That same year, Professor Longenecker came to UT as a research associate and completed his master’s thesis, “Some Non-enzymatic Reactions of Pydrioxal with Amino Acids,” under the guidance of Dr. Esmond E. Snell, in 1954. Under the mentorship of Dr. Snell, Professor Longenecker completed his doctorate in chemistry in 1956 with a dissertation entitled, “Some Non-enzymatic Reactions of Amino Acids Catalyzed by Pyridoxal and Metal Ions.”

Professor Longenecker briefly left the University to work as a senior research nutritional biochemist at DuPont and as director and supervisor of nutritional research at Mead Johnson Research Laboratories. During his time at Mead Johnson, Dr. Longenecker developed total complete liquid diets for humans, the precursors to nutritional supplements like Sustacal and Ensure, both of which are still widely used in hospitals. Dr. Longenecker returned to UT in 1964 as professor of nutrition and head of the Division of Nutrition and Foods. Under his guidance, the division grew from a faculty of four with fifty undergraduate students and five graduate students to a faculty of fifteen supporting the education and research of 175 undergraduate and thirty-nine graduate students. This expansion was instrumental in the establishment of the Department of Nutritional Sciences two decades later. In addition to his administrative responsibilities as division head, Professor Longenecker served as the director of research in protein and amino acid nutrition in the College of Natural Sciences from 1971 to 1989. In 1988, he was chosen to lead the Department of Human Ecology (at that time, the Department of Home Economics) as chairman, a position he held until 1989 when he was named director of the Institute of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Jack was elected professor emeritus in 1993, a distinction he held at both UT and at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Professor Longenecker was an inspired teacher and was known nationally and internationally for his research in amino acids. Professor Longenecker’s research focus was primarily devoted to biochemistry with special emphasis on protein quality and amino acid requirements. Professor Longenecker’s research interests were varied but far-reaching: from analysis of the protein content of military rations just prior to the Vietnam War; to the development of an animal model to speed associated research on the metabolic disorder PKU, a preventable cause of mental retardation; to identification of nutritional factors in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. His research was supported by multiple, simultaneous grants over the course of his career, most notably from the National Institutes of Health, the United States Department of Department of Agriculture, and the National Science Foundation. In 1999, he was elected as a fellow of the American Society for Nutrition in recognition of his outstanding research career and his contributions to the field of nutritional sciences.

Professor Longenecker passed away on November 16, 2009. He is survived by his wife, Myrna; daughter, Luanne Gytri and her husband, John; and four grandchildren, Catharine Ahls, Caroline Ahls, Donald Gytri, and Julia Gytri. He was preceded in death by his daughter Karen Longenecker.



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William Powers Jr., President
The University of Texas at Austin



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Sue Alexander Greninger, Secretary
The General Faculty


This memorial resolution was prepared by a special committee consisting of Professors Jeanne Freeland-Graves (chair), RoseAnn Loop, and Catherine Surra.

  Updated 2013 October 18
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