D 11093-11102


DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AND ARTS DEGREE PROGRAM IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES SECTION IN THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2014-2016

Dean Linda A. Hicke in the College of Natural Sciences has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council the following changes to the College of Natural Sciences section in the Undergraduate Catalog, 2014-2016. The departments, the college faculty, and the dean approved the changes on September 11, 2013, September 25, 2013, and September 30, 2013, respectively. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation as being of general interest to more than one college or school (but not for submission to the General Faculty).

The Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review recommended approval of the change on December 11, 2013, and forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty. The Faculty Council has the authority to approve this legislation on behalf of the General Faculty. The authority to grant final approval on this legislation resides with UT System.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If an objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Facultyby January 17, 2014.
Dean P. Neikirk

Dean P. Neikirk, Secretary
General Faculty and Faculty Council


Posted on the Faculty Council website on January 2, 2014.


PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AND ARTS DEGREE PROGRAM IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES SECTION IN THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG, 2014-2016

Type of Change:
x
Academic Change

IF THE ANSWER TO ANY OF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS IS YES, THE COLLEGE MUST CONSULT NEAL ARMSTRONG WHO WILL DETERMINE WHETHER SACS-COC APPROVAL IS NEEDED:
• Is this a new degree program? No
• Does the program offer courses that will be taught off campus? No
• Will courses in this program be delivered electronically? No

EXPLAIN CHANGE TO DEGREE PROGRAM AND GIVE A DETAILED RATIONALE FOR EACH INDIVIDUAL CHANGE:
1. The Textiles and Apparel faculty propose renaming each of the three TXA options:
Option I: Name change from Apparel Design and Conservation to Apparel, Functional, and Technical Design reflects the current educational focus and the breadth of competencies our design students are offered. The proposed name more accurately reflects the skills and techniques taught in all courses throughout this program in the revised curriculum. The proposed name also matches present-day industry developments embracing new technologies, as well as the range of career paths available to students graduating from this degree program.

The industry now demands qualified professionals who can precisely communicate the technical details of a garment and who can incorporate novel cutting-edge technology to design innovative functional solutions for specific needs. Course offerings in the program have been realigned to give increased emphasis to advances in technology and to offer students competencies not only in apparel design, but also in technical and functional design. Possible technical design lab projects and field experiences may include interaction with bio-textiles, textile-based medical equipment, protective clothing for first responders, performance gear, and smart textiles.

Option II: The name change from Retail Merchandising to Merchandising and Consumer Sciences is proposed to reflect the broad scope of consumer-oriented practices in the fields of merchandising, retailing, e-tailing, management, entrepreneurship, consumer behavior and sales of consumer goods and services in a variety of settings. The change reflects current trends in program names with a focus on understanding the consumer, meeting the needs of the consumer by developing or selecting merchandise, presenting products when and where the consumer wants them at a price point that is acceptable.

Option IV: Textile Conservation and Museum Studies was chosen as the better name for the new degree plan after soliciting comments from other professionals in the field. They felt that:
A. The term "conservation" carried too general a connotation in terms of an ecological frame.
Example: Dictionary definition: Preservation, protection, or restoration of the natural environment, natural ecosystems, vegetation, and wildlife. Therefore, they suggested the addition of the word "textiles" to clarify the intent and specialized skill set to be obtained.
B. Many entry-level jobs require education/preparation in museum organization and maintenance and that having only "conservation" in the title might falsely intimate that the degree was limited to conservation/treatment skills when clearly the curriculum makes it evident that the degree is much broader. Therefore, they suggested the addition of "museum studies" to the title of the degree.
2. Options I and II: Change the mathematics and statistics requirements to require SDS 302 and either calculus (M 408C or 408N) or the newly approved SDS 332, Statistical Models for the Health and Behavioral Sciences.
Rationale: Students need more advanced statistical training to comprehend results sections the journal articles in their field that they will be reading in most of their upper-division courses. Students doing research also require more advanced statistical training. Most of our students would be much better served if they took an advanced statistics course rather than calculus, as calculus is not a necessary prerequisite for any of our upper-division courses.
3. Option I: Remove the conservation specialization and establish separate conservation option. Option I’s new title: Apparel, Functional, and Technical Design.
Rationale: The proposed changes in TXA curriculum include a revised set of core courses that all TXA students will take (twenty-nine hours) and three revised streams: Apparel, Functional, and Technical Design (twenty-four hours); Merchandising and Consumer Sciences (twenty-five hours); and Textile Conservation and Museum Studies (twenty-five hours). It has been over ten years since the curriculum has been revised and current offerings are in need of updating. The proposed changes have been made after a systematic comparison with peer programs and an assessment of the marketplace students will enter.

The Apparel, Functional, and Technical Design option has been changed to more fully concentrate on issues of design separate and apart from issues of conservation.
4. Option I: Remove three hours of lower-division coursework in anthropology, economics, psychology, or sociology; and six hours of upper-division coursework in American studies, anthropology, cultural studies, psychology, or sociology.
Rationale:
The Division of Textiles and Apparel removed course requirements that are not essential and created lists of suggested elective courses as guides for students in the Apparel, Functional, and Technical Design option. The electives are not required and will be used during the advising process. The removal of non-essential courses creates flexibility for students who want to pursue honors, hands-on research, and study abroad opportunities. It will also assist transfer students entering the field of study who have already completed many elective courses.
5. Option I: Remove nine hours of business foundations courses.
Rationale:
The Division of Textiles and Apparel removed course requirements that are not essential and created lists of suggested elective courses as guides for students in the Apparel, Functional, and Technical Design option. The electives are not required and will be used during the advising process. The removal of non-essential courses creates flexibility for students who want to pursue honors, hands-on research, and study abroad opportunities. It will also assist transfer students entering the field of study who have already completed many elective courses.
6. Option I: Remove previous TXA degree requirements; insert TXA degree requirements consisting of twenty-nine hours of common core courses and twenty-four hours of option courses.
Rationale:
The proposed changes in TXA curriculum include a revised set of core courses that all TXA students will take (twenty-nine hours) and a revised Apparel, Functional, and Technical Design option consisting of twenty-four hours. It has been over ten years since the curriculum has been revised and current offerings are in need of updating. The proposed changes have been made after a systematic comparison with peer programs and an assessment of the marketplace students will enter.
7. Option II: Remove three hours from PSY, ANT, or SOC; reduce ECO requirement from six to three hours, and specify ECO 304K.
Rationale: The Division of Textiles and Apparel removed course requirements that are not essential (three hours from PSY, ANT, or SOC). Three hours of ECO were retained as it is a prerequisite for required TXA 361, Consumer Behavior in the Marketplace.
8. Option II: Remove BIO 311D.
Rationale: The Division of Textiles and Apparel removed course requirements that are not essential and created lists of suggested elective courses as guides for students in the Merchandising and Consumer Sciences option. The electives are not required and will be used during the advising process. The removal of non-essential courses creates flexibility for students who want to pursue honors, hands-on research, and study abroad opportunities. It will also assist transfer students entering the field of study who have already completed many elective courses.
9. Option II: Remove ARH 301.
Rationale: The Division of Textiles and Apparel removed course requirements that are not essential and created lists of suggested elective courses as guides for students in the Merchandising and Consumer Sciences option. The electives are not required and will be used during the advising process. The removal of non-essential courses creates flexibility for students who want to pursue honors, hands-on research, and study abroad opportunities. It will also assist transfer students entering the field of study who have already completed many elective courses.
10. Option II: Remove six hours of communications and six hours of business foundations.
Rationale: The Division of Textiles and Apparel removed course requirements that are not essential and created lists of suggested elective courses as guides for students in the Merchandising and Consumer Sciences option. The electives are not required and will be used during the advising process. The removal of non-essential courses creates flexibility for students who want to pursue honors, hands-on research, and study abroad opportunities. It will also assist transfer students entering the field of study who have already completed many elective courses.
11. Option II: Remove previous TXA degree requirements; insert TXA degree requirements consisting of twenty-nine hours of common core courses and twenty-five hours of Merchandising and Consumer Sciences option courses.
Rationale: The proposed changes in TXA curriculum include a revised set of core courses that all TXA students will take (twenty-nine hours) and revised the Merchandising and Consumer Sciences option consists of twenty-five hours. It has been over ten years since the curriculum has been revised and current offerings are in need of updating. The proposed changes have been made after a systematic comparison with peer programs and an assessment of the marketplace students will enter.

The Merchandising and Consumer Sciences option will continue to focus on the development and analysis of product, procurement, promotion, distribution, and retailing of consumer goods while emphasizing the importance of meeting consumers’ needs and preferences for goods.
12. Option III: Req #7:  Change the names of the streams, or options.
Rationale:  According to the changes requested to options I and II and with the new option IV.
13. Option IV:
a. Establish separate degree option for Textile Conservation and Museum Studies, formerly part of the Apparel Design and Conservation Option—Option I now known as Apparel, Functional, and Technical Design option.
Rationale: The proposed changes in TXA curriculum include a revised set of core courses that all TXA students will take (29 hours) and Textile Conservation and Museum Studies consisting of 25 hours. It has been over 10 years since the curriculum has been revised and current offerings are in need of updating. The proposed changes have been made after a systematic comparison with peer programs and an assessment of the marketplace students will enter.

Students interested in conservation and collection management are better served with a set of courses more directly focused on competencies in organic chemistry, testing technology and knowledge related to the organization, operation, conservation, and exhibition of collections of textile related artifacts.
b. Retain the mathematics, statistics, and chemistry degree requirements from the former conservation specialization within the former Apparel Design and Conservation option.
Rationale: The previous mathematics, statistics, and chemistry requirements remain valid for the newly named Textile Conservation and Museum Studies option as these courses continue to provide necessary content and background.
c. Remove 9 hours of business foundations courses.
Rationale: The Division of Textiles and Apparel removed course requirements that are not essential and created lists of suggested elective courses as guides for students in the Textile Conservation and Museum Studies option. The electives are not required and will be used during the advising process. The removal of non-essential courses creates flexibility for students who want to pursue honors, hands-on research, and study abroad opportunities. It will also assist transfer students entering the field of study who have already completed many elective courses.
d. Remove three hours of lower-division coursework in anthropology, economics, psychology, or sociology; and six hours of upper-division coursework in American studies, anthropology, cultural studies, psychology, or sociology. Add Anthropology 302 and 304.
Rationale: The Division of Textiles and Apparel removed course requirements that are not essential. ANT 302 and ANT 304 are the introductory courses for Anthropology and Archaeology. Anthropology courses are encouraged because many collaborative research and exhibition projects are undertaken between the two fields. The anthropological approach to “whole culture” analysis is also prevalent in museum work. Archaeology is a “sister” discipline in research and exhibition.
e. .Remove ARH 303 and 9 hours of upper-division art history or studio art, previously required for conservation specialization.
Rationale: The Division of Textiles and Apparel removed course requirements that are not essential and created lists of suggested elective courses as guides for students in the Textile Conservation and Museum Studies option. The electives are not required and will be used during the advising process. The removal of non-essential courses creates flexibility for students who want to pursue honors, hands-on research, and study abroad opportunities. It will also assist transfer students entering the field of study who have already completed many elective courses.
f. Insert TXA degree requirements consisting of 29 hours of common core courses and 25 hours of Textile Conservation and Museum Studies option courses.
Rationale: The proposed changes in TXA curriculum include a revised set of core courses that all TXA students will take (29 hours) and Textile Conservation and Museum Studies option consisting of 24 hours. It has been over 10 years since the curriculum has been revised and current offerings are in need of updating. The proposed changes have been made after a systematic comparison with peer programs and an assessment of the marketplace students will enter.

The Textile Conservation and Museum Studies option was formerly part of the Apparel Design and Conservation Option. Students interested in conservation and collection management are better served with a set of courses more directly focused on competencies in organic chemistry, testing technology and knowledge related to the organization, operation, conservation, and exhibition of collections of textile related artifacts.
14. Change the language to accommodate addition of 3 flags, in ethics and leadership, independent inquiry, and quantitative reasoning.
Rationale: The college added independent inquiry flags to many of its courses, and many degree requirements include courses that are flagged with the quantitative reasoning flag. The college is hopeful that there are sufficient flagged ethics & leadership courses to enable students to accept these flags. The college encourages students to select flagged courses that fulfill other degree requirements.

SCOPE OF THE PROPOSED CHANGE(S):

Does this proposal impact other colleges/schools? If yes, then how?
  No.
Will students in other degree programs be impacted (are the proposed changes to courses commonly taken by students in other colleges)?
  No.
If yes, explain:
 

N/A

Will students from your college take courses in other colleges?
  No.
If 3 a, b, or c was answered with yes:
  How many students do you expect to be impacted?
Impacted schools must be contacted and their response(s) included:
 
Does this proposal involve changes to the core curriculum or other basic education requirements (42-hour core, signature courses, flags)?
  No.
If yes, explain:
  N/A
If yes, undergraduate studies must be informed of the proposed changes and their response included:
  N/A
Will this proposal change the number of required hours for degree completion?
  No.
If yes, explain:
  N/A
COLLEGE/SCHOOL APPROVAL PROCESS:
Department:
Yes
Date:

Astronomy change: September 4, 2013
Biology changes: July 10, 2013 and September 4, 2013
Biochemistry September 4, 2013 and September 9, 2013
Chemistry change: September 11, 2013
Computer Science changes: September 4, 2013
Human Development and Family Sciences changes: May 7, 2013 and September 4, 2013
Human Ecology: July 15, 2013 and September 4, 2013
Nutrition changes: September 3, 2013
Mathematics changes: April 16, 2013
Nutrition changes: September 3, 2013
Neuroscience changes: September 3, 2013 and September 4, 2013.

College:
Yes
Date: July 20, 2013;
September 4, 2013;
September 11, 2013;
September 25, 2013.
Dean:
Yes
Date: September 30, 2013

View the edited version of the catalog changes.