D 11134-11141


DOCUMENTS OF THE GENERAL FACULTY

REQUEST TO CREATE A FOOD AND SOCIETY CERTIFICATE, AN UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND REQUEST FOR RECOGNITION ON THE UNIVERSITY TRANSCRIPTS

Dean Linda A. Hicke in the College of Natural Sciences has filed with the secretary of the Faculty Council a proposal to create a Food and Society Certificate in the College of Natural Sciences section in the Undergraduate Catalog, 2014-2016. Administrators in the School of Human Ecology and the College of Natural Sciences approved the changes on August 27, 2013, and September 30, 2013, respectively. The secretary has classified this proposal as legislation as being of general interest to more than one college or school (but not for submission to the General Faculty).

The Committee on Undergraduate Degree Program Review recommended approval of the change on December 11, 2013, and forwarded the proposed changes to the Office of the General Faculty. The Faculty Council has the authority to approve this legislation on behalf of the General Faculty. Because the certificate requires twenty semester hours or less, final approval resides with UT System.

If no objection is filed with the Office of the General Faculty by the date specified below, the legislation will be held to have been approved by the Faculty Council. If an objection is filed within the prescribed period, the legislation will be presented to the Faculty Council at its next meeting. The objection, with reasons, must be signed by a member of the Faculty Council.

To be counted, a protest must be received in the Office of the General Facultyby January 17, 2014.
Dean P. Neikirk

Dean P. Neikirk, Secretary
General Faculty and Faculty Council


Posted on the Faculty Council website on January 2, 2014.


REQUEST TO CREATE A FOOD AND SOCIETY CERTIFICATE, AN UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND REQUEST FOR RECOGNITION ON THE UNIVERSITY TRANSCRIPTS

1. Type of Proposal       New Certificate Program (requiring THECB notification only)

2. Scope of Proposed Change
a. Does this proposal impact other colleges/schools? Yes.
If yes, then how?
Students across the university may pursue this certificate. The certificate will encourage students to take courses in nutrition. Prerequisites for select nutrition courses are being altered to encourage non-major enrollment. In addition, Natural Sciences students will be exposed to coursework in other colleges such as Liberal Arts and Nursing.
b. Will students in other degree programs be impacted (are the proposed changes to courses commonly taken by students in other colleges)? Yes.            
c. Will students from your college take courses in other colleges?  Yes.
If the answer to 2a, 2b, or 2c is “yes”:

How many students do you expect to be impacted? 
The School of Human Ecology anticipates awarding forty to fifty certificates a year. This translates to an average yearly impact of 162 seats distributed across approximately twenty non-Natural Sciences courses.

Impacted schools must be contacted and their response(s) included:
School of Nursing
Person communicated with:  Gayle Timmerman, Associate Dean
Date of communication:  August 12, 2013  
Response:  Count Nursing in.
Dept. of American Studies
Person communicated with:  Elizabeth Engelhardt, Chair
Date of communication:  August 6, 2013
Response:  Count AMS in, please. (Lydia and I have already talked about courses that might count.)
Dept. of Anthropology
Person communicated with:  Kathleen Stewart, Chair
Date of communication:  August 13, 2013
Response:  Of course. Approved.
Dept. of Asian Studies
Person communicated with:  Martha Selby, Chair
Date of communication:  July 23, 2013
Response:  Yes, count us in. Think about adding Professor Nancy Stalker’s ANS 379, “Cuisine and Culture in Asia.”
:  Dept. of Classics
Person communicated with:  Stephen White, Chair
Date of communication:  July 24, 2013
Response:  Glad to see this moving forward. Absolutely do count us in.
Dept. of Geography and the Environment
Person communicated with:  Brian Roberts, Interim Chair
Date of communication:  July 23, 2013; August 7, 2013
Response:  July 23rd:  You have identified the two relevant courses offered by Geography and the Environment. Can’t think of any other that would come close. So, you are good to go as far as we’re concerned.  August 7th:  The three in question (GRG 331K – Cultural Ecology, GRG 356 – Environmental Health and GRG 356T – Human Health and the Environment) were all taught this year. Go ahead and list them.
Dept. of Government
Person communicated with:  Gary Freeman, Chair
Date of communication:  July 23, 2013
Response:  The one Gov course is approved; don’t think there are any other relevant offerings.
Dept. of Rhetoric and Writing
Person communicated with:  Jeffrey Walker, Chair
Date of communication:  July 27, 2013
Response:  RHE 309K courses are designed and taught by AIs  (with supervision); the individual titles do not go into the permanent catalog, and more or less disappear when the AI completes his/her degree and moves on.  So, while this course probably would be a good fit for your program, you probably shouldn't count on it.  We're happy, of course, for F&S students to take any RHE 309K that fits their program. It's something that would need to be done on a year-by-year (or even semester-by-semester) basis.
Dept. of Sociology
Person communicated with:  Christine Williams, Chair
Date of communication:  August 15, 2013
Response:  Yes, Sociology is happy to be a part of this.
Marine Science Institute
Person communicated with:  Edward Buskey, Interim Chair
Date of communication:  August 13, 2013
Response:  Yes, I approve the addition of MNS 308 in the Food and Society Certificate. The only other class we offer that might be appropriate would be MNS 367K Human Exploration and Exploitation of the Sea. It includes some discussion of marine policy and fisheries related issues.

3. Official Certificate Name: Food and Society Certificate

4. Proposed Implementation Date: Fall 2014

5.

CIP Code (administrative unit awarding the certificate): School of Human Ecology

6. Statement of Objective:
Food is a complex and rapidly emergent topic in today's society. Of the seven billion people living on the planet, over one billion go hungry every night, and even more are overweight or clinically obese. In America and around the globe, topics ranging from global production practices, food safety, environmental sustainability, access to local and organic food production, and the content of school lunches, are all at the forefront of scientific inquiry, political debate, and dinner table conversation. Though food-related issues vary widely in focus, they are all linked by their complexity and deeply interdisciplinary nature, each relating to topics of health and nutrition, genetics, politics, culture, the environment, economics, and business.

By providing a Food & Society Certificate at the University of Texas at Austin, we are providing students with the opportunity to appreciate the full range of these interdisciplinary ties and apply new perspectives to their primary academic majors and careers. By equipping them with this broad foundation in the topics of Food Studies, students will be able to apply a more comprehensive understanding of the implications of their actions and decisions, find better solutions to today's complex problems, formulate more effective public policy, become more informed and active citizens, and make healthier choices for themselves and their families.

7. Number of Students Expected to Receive the Certificate Each Semester: 25 to 50

8. Number of Hours Required for Completion: 18 hours

9. List Faculty on the Certificate Program Faculty Committee.

Name of Faculty Member

College/Department

Title at UT Austin

Highest Degree and Awarding Institution

Lydia Steinman, Program Chair

Natural Sciences /Dept. of Nutritional Sciences

Undergraduate Instructional Administrator for Nutrition

M.A., The University of Texas at Austin.

* Elizabeth Engelhardt

Liberal Arts/Dept. of American Studies

Professor, Chair

Ph.D., Emory University

* Adam Rabinowitz

Liberal Arts/Dept. of Classics

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

* Gregory Knapp

Liberal Arts/Dept. of Geography and the Environment

Associate Professor

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison

* Sheldon Ekland-Olson

Liberal Arts/Dept. of Sociology; Natural Sciences/ Dept. of Human Ecology

Professor and Director of School of Human Ecology

Ph.D., University of Washington

* Christopher Jolly

Natural Sciences /Dept. of Nutritional Sciences

Associate Professor and NTR Graduate Chair

Ph.D., Texas A&M University

* Margaret Briley

Natural Sciences /Dept. of Nutritional Sciences

Professor

Ph.D., Texas Tech University

* Jaimie Davis

Natural Sciences /Dept. of Nutritional Sciences

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Rosa Schnyer

Nursing

Clinical Assistant Professor

DAOM (Doctor in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine), Portland, OR



10. Academic Course Requirements:
Use this table to identify the courses that qualify for this certificate program.

Course Abbreviation and Number

Course Title

SCH

NTR 306

Fundamentals of Nutrition

3

NTR 312

Introduction to Nutritional Sciences #
# CH 301; M 408C, 408K, or 408N; and credit or registration for BIO 311C and CH 302.

3

NTR 312H

Introduction to Nutritional Sciences:  Honors #
# CH 301 or 301H; M 408C or 408N; and credit or registration for BIO 311C or 315H and CH 302 or 302H.

3

NTR 307

Introductory Food Science #
# NTR 312 or 312H; and credit or registration for NTR 107L.

3

NTR 218

Assessment of Nutritional Status #
# NTR 312 and 112L, or 312H and 312R; and credit or registration for NTR 118L.

2

NTR 118L

Assessment of Nutritional Status Laboratory #
# Credit or registration for NTR 218.

Nutrition through the Life Cycle #
# NTR 306, 312, or 312H.

1

NTR 315

Nutrition through the Life Cycle #
# NTR 306, 312, or 312H.

3

NTR 316

Culture and Food #
# NTR 306, 312, or 312H.

3

NTR 321

International Nutrition:  The Developing World #
# NTR 306, 312, or 312H.

3

NTR 330

Nutrition Education and Counseling #
# NTR 315 and 326.

3

NTR 331

International Nutrition:  Social and Environmental Policies #
# Upper-division standing; and NTR 306, 312, or 312H.

3

NTR 332

Community Nutrition #
# NTR 312 or 312H; 315; and 326.

3

NTR 334

Foodservice Systems Management #
# NTR 307, 107L, and 326; and credit or registration for NTR 234L.

3

NTR 353

Field Experience in International Nutrition #
# NTR 306, 312, or 12H; and approval of an application to study abroad.

3

NTR 365

Topic 4:  Obesity and Metabolic Health #
#NTR 312 or 312H and BIO 365S.

3

MNS 308

Humans and a Changing Ocean #
# MSN 307.

3

MNS 367K

Human Exploration and Exploitation of the Sea #
# MNS 307.

3

AMS 370

Topic 26:  American Food #
# Upper-division standing.

3

ANT 307

Culture and Communication

3

ANS 379

Topic 7:  Cuisine and Culture in Asia Capstone Seminars in Asian Studies #
# For Asian studies and Asian cultures and languages majors, twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in Asian studies or Asian languages; for others, upper-division standing.

3

CC 340

Topic 6:  Food, Health, and Culture in the Ancient Mediterranean #
# Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

3

CC 348

Topic 14:  Ancient Greek Medicine #
# Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

3

GOV 370L

Topic 21:  Politics of Food in America #
# 6 hours of lower-division coursework in government.

3

GRG 331K

Cultural Ecology #

# Upper-division standing.

3

GRG 339K

Environment, Development, and Food Production #
# Upper-division standing.

3

GRG 344K

Global Food, Farming, and Hunger #
# Upper-division standing.

3

N 309

Global Health

3

SOC 308S

Introduction to Health and Society

3

Semester Credit Hours.



11. Other Certificate Requirements: N/A

12. Give a Detailed Rationale for Change(s):
Food is a complex and rapidly emergent topic in today's society. Of the seven billion people living on the planet, over one billion go hungry every night, and even more are overweight or clinically obese. In America and around the globe, topics ranging from global production practices, food safety, environmental sustainability, access to local and organic food production, and the content of school lunches, are all at the forefront of scientific inquiry, political debate, and dinner table conversation. Though food-related issues vary widely in focus, they are all linked by their complexity and deeply interdisciplinary nature, each relating to topics of health and nutrition, genetics, politics, culture, the environment, economics, and business.

By providing a Food & Society Certificate at the University of Texas at Austin, we are providing students with the opportunity to appreciate the full range of these interdisciplinary ties and apply new perspectives to their primary academic majors and careers. By equipping them with this broad foundation in the topics of Food Studies, students will be able to apply a more comprehensive understanding of the implications of their actions and decisions, find better solutions to today's complex problems, formulate more effective public policy, become more informed and active citizens, and make healthier choices for themselves and their families.

13. College/School Approval Process:
Approver: School of Human Ecology
Date: August 27, 2013
Title:
Sheldon Ekland-Olson, Director

Approver: College of Natural Sciences/Sacha Kopp
Date: September 30, 2013
Title: Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education