Tag Archive: Bureau of Economic Geology RSS

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin are changing the way we understand everything from artificial intelligence to hydraulic fracturing

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin are changing the way we understand everything from artificial intelligence to hydraulic fracturing

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin are changing the way we understand everything from artificial intelligence to hydraulic fracturing. Many of these faculty members will be joining leading researchers from around the world this month at the annual American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Vancouver, British Columbia. Dr. Peter Stone…   » Continue Reading

Researchers put state at forefront of renewable energy revolution

Researchers put state at forefront of renewable energy revolution

Green, Texas: Texans like to think of themselves as the best. Over the past decade, environmentalists have rated the state No. 1, but not in a good way: number one for per capita energy consumption, major environmental complaints and emission of air pollution and greenhouse gases. What if the state could add a new ranking: No. 1 in green energy. Sound far fetched? It’s not, according to Michael Webber, an energy specialist at The University of Texas at Austin’s Cockrell School of Engineering and Jackson School of Geosciences, where he is associate director of the Center for International Energy and Environmental Policy.

Scientists seek sustainable water supply for a thirsty world

Scientists seek sustainable water supply for a thirsty world

Edge of the Desert: Around the world, water supplies are threatened. The discovery of drugs in public drinking water is just the latest crisis in the United States. From California to Columbia, a larger problem looms—the ongoing availability of the resource itself. Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin are at the forefront of scientific efforts to ensure a sustainable global water supply, examining water use for energy, agriculture and population growth.