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New College of Education study explores how tenure-track fathers negotiate work-family conflicts

New College of Education study explores how tenure-track fathers negotiate work-family conflicts

Sick kids. Sleepless nights. Conflicts between work and daycare. Although research suggests that most dual-income couples share parenting duties, many people still believe that mothers are the true primary caregivers. And the most beleaguered. Dr. Richard Reddick and his son Karl But according to a new qualitative study out of The University of Texas at…   » Continue Reading

Scholar who studies communities in crisis creates explosive film about Mexico kidnappings

Scholar who studies communities in crisis creates explosive film about Mexico kidnappings

¡Ya Basta!: This isn’t fiction and these aren’t actors. The torture is real. The film is “¡Ya Basta!” (“Enough!”), and it’s a disturbing, intimate documentary of an epidemic of kidnappings and related crimes that started in Mexico in the ’90s. The film was directed by University of Texas at Austin educational psychology Professor Ricardo Ainslie, and it’s not the first record he’s made of a community in crisis. It’s just the first time the community has been his hometown.

Surprising region of brain may contribute to autism, says neuroscientist

Surprising region of brain may contribute to autism, says neuroscientist

Autism on the Mind: In March, Oxford neurologist Lady Susan Greenfield announced in the House of Lords, and in an interview with the United Kingdom’s Daily Mail, that she thinks social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter and MySpace can “rewire” children’s brains and cause autism. This led countless panicked parents to ask at what age they should unglue their kids from computers to keep them from “catching” autism. Dr. Greg Allen, a neuroscientist in The University of Texas at Austin’s College of Education, can’t announce just yet that he has an airtight answer, but he’s on a promising track.

Educational psychologist says practicing self-compassion can relieve stress, improve relationships

Educational psychologist says practicing self-compassion can relieve stress, improve relationships

Try a Little Tenderness: This can be a touchy subject, especially for parents, but recent research cautions there’s such a thing as too much self-esteem. Many child-rearing books now tentatively suggest it’s not necessary for parents to lavish “good job, good job” on their five-year-old when he blows his nose on his sleeve. As it turns out, criminals, bullies and bigots often have high self-esteem.

Stay-at-home dads’ psychological well-being gauged in new study

Stay-at-home dads’ psychological well-being gauged in new study

There’s a rusty old riddle that goes something like this: A man and his son were in a car accident. The man died on the way to the hospital, but the boy was rushed into surgery. Upon arriving in the operating room, the surgeon said, “I shouldn’t operate on this child—he’s my son!” How is…   » Continue Reading