Tag Archive: Research RSS

On April 14, Honors Day will salute extraordinary undergraduates who have distinguished themselves through talent, hard work and intellectual endeavor

On April 14, Honors Day will salute extraordinary undergraduates who have distinguished themselves through talent, hard work and intellectual endeavor

One is an avid chess player who applies her fascination of the game’s emphasis on creative problem solving to her research on retinal image processing. Kelly Moynihan (left) and Anjali Datta are among the 3,914 students who will be recognized for academic excellence during Honors Day at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 14, at the Frank…   » Continue Reading

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin are changing the way we understand everything from artificial intelligence to hydraulic fracturing

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin are changing the way we understand everything from artificial intelligence to hydraulic fracturing

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin are changing the way we understand everything from artificial intelligence to hydraulic fracturing. Many of these faculty members will be joining leading researchers from around the world this month at the annual American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Vancouver, British Columbia. Dr. Peter Stone…   » Continue Reading

For earlier and more reliable diagnosis of glaucoma, engineers are developing a detection device that bridges advanced research and practical applications

For earlier and more reliable diagnosis of glaucoma, engineers are developing a detection device that bridges advanced research and practical applications

Three days a week, Dr. Grady Rylander treats patients at the Eye Institute of Austin, a private practice he joined 34 years ago after graduating from The University of Texas at Austin and finishing his residency at UT Health Science Center at San Antonio. Of the 60 to 90 patients Rylander treats weekly, half are…   » Continue Reading

From forecasting shuttle re-entry to medical procedure outcomes, engineers are working fast to create computer models we can trust

From forecasting shuttle re-entry to medical procedure outcomes, engineers are working fast to create computer models we can trust

Days before the space shuttle Columbia began its ill-fated return to Earth on Feb. 1, 2003, NASA engineers tried to evaluate the severity of damage sustained two weeks before, when a piece of foam had struck the shuttle during takeoff and damaged its thermal protection system. Engineering and computational researchers at The University of Texas…   » Continue Reading

Physicist and engineer’s device could provide cheap and early detection of earthquakes, lung cancer and infant lactose intolerance

Physicist and engineer’s device could provide cheap and early detection of earthquakes, lung cancer and infant lactose intolerance

Manfred Fink didn’t set out to build a device that could cheaply test for earthquakes, lung cancer and lactose intolerance. Fink, a professor of physics in the College of Natural Sciences, set out to do the kind of thing that an experimental physicist might do — try to pin down the rest mass of the…   » Continue Reading

Spinal cord injury victims enjoy better health, thanks to the research of neuroscientist Lisa Griffin and Kinesiology and Health Education collaborators

Spinal cord injury victims enjoy better health, thanks to the research of neuroscientist Lisa Griffin and Kinesiology and Health Education collaborators

After Gary Krutsinger T-boned his truck in a wreck just outside Austin in 2009, he couldn’t feel his arms or legs. Thinking it was a temporary problem, he told the rescue workers to just leave him alone for a few minutes – he’d be fine, he said. The paralysis wasn’t temporary, though, and after doctors…   » Continue Reading

With the help of supercomputing power, researchers explore the health risks of wireless devices through virtual body models and advanced algorithms

With the help of supercomputing power, researchers explore the health risks of wireless devices through virtual body models and advanced algorithms

VIDEO Every moment, we’re swimming in a sea of electromagnetic radiation. Appliances, power lines, cellphones, Wi-Fi and a slew of other modern technologies emit microwaves that pass through, and interact with, our bodies. As wireless technology continues to proliferate in our daily lives, anxiety builds about its dangers.  Do cellphones cause cancer? Impact fertility? Affect…   » Continue Reading

Aerospace engineer Byron Tapley’s satellite mission to measure gravity leads to discoveries about ice sheets, sea levels, floods and droughts

Aerospace engineer Byron Tapley’s satellite mission to measure gravity leads to discoveries about ice sheets, sea levels, floods and droughts

NASA scientists surveying water resources around the world with a pair of satellites 320 miles above Earth noticed something unusual in northwestern India in 2009. Farmers in the area known as the Bread Basket of India, which encompasses 438,000 square kilometers, were emptying the region’s aquifer faster than it could be replenished. Dr. Byron Tapley,…   » Continue Reading

Health communication researchers devise strategies to empower people to make informed decisions about their health

Health communication researchers devise strategies to empower people to make informed decisions about their health

In the middle of the night, while soothing her feverish daughter, a mother strains to read the instructions on the bottle of Children’s Tylenol. The dosage instructions state one and one-half teaspoons, but the mother gives her daughter one and one-half tablespoons — more than four times the recommended dosage. A 57-year-old man about to…   » Continue Reading

Archaeologists and technologists develop supercomputer-powered solutions to protect and preserve ancient sites and artifacts

Archaeologists and technologists develop supercomputer-powered solutions to protect and preserve ancient sites and artifacts

VIDEO When Adam Rabinowitz was 15 years old, his aunt, an archaeologist, invited him to join her on a dig in Sicily. Twenty-three years later, Rabinowitz, now the assistant director at the Institute of Classical Archaeology (ICA) at The University of Texas at Austin, is still traveling around the world getting dirt under his nails.…   » Continue Reading