Department of Art and Art History Art History

Jessamine Batario receives $20,000 dissertation fellowship from Dedalus Foundation

Wed. September 30, 2015

woman in blue shirt and slacks poses for picture in front of tree

Jessamine Batario, a doctoral candidate in Art History, has been awarded a $20,000 Dedalus Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for 2015–2016. Batario’s dissertation, “The Art and Intellectual History of Byzantine Modernism,” seeks to establish the significance of a “Byzantine Modern” art history alongside other narratives of modernism and to contribute to the discipline’s recent evaluation of institutional periodization.

Batario received a B.A. in art history from the University of California, Berkeley and a M.A. in Art History from the Department of Art and Art History at The University of Texas at Austin. Her interests lie in 19th century European painting, history of art history, phenomenology and hermeneutics.

Batario’s work focuses on Modern art and critical theory. Her research interests include European and American modernism, Byzantine art, mid-20th century art criticism and history of art history. For two years, she worked as the graduate research assistant for Dr. Richard Shiff in the Center for the Study of Modernism. She has also served the Department of Art and Art History as the Ph.D. co-chair of the Graduate Student Art History Association and the co-chair of the Research Roundtable. Batario also holds a Named/Endowed Continuing Fellowship from the Graduate School at UT Austin.

Founded in 1981 by the artist Robert Motherwell (1915–1991), the Dedalus Foundation fosters public understanding of modern art and modernism through its programs in arts education, research and publications, archives and conservation, and exhibitions, as well as in the guardianship and study of Robert Motherwell’s art.

The Dedalus Foundation Dissertation Fellowship is awarded annually to a Ph.D. candidate at a university in the United States who is working on a dissertation related to painting, sculpture and allied arts from 1940-1970, with a preference shown to Abstract Expressionism.

Tatiana Reinoza and Luis Vargas-Santiago present curatorial project at Snite Museum of Art

Tue. September 15, 2015

ashes spread on floor of gallery
Image courtesy of the artist and the Visual Arts Center.

Tatiana Reinoza (M.A. in Art History, 2009; Ph.D. candidate in Art History) and Luis Vargas-Santiago present curatorial project Counter-Archives to the Narco-City at the Snite Museum of Art. The two-person exhibition features work by Adriana Corral (M.F.A. in Studio Art, 2013) and will be on view August 16 – December 13, 2015.

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