Department of Art and Art History Conference or Seminar

Faculty and alumni participate in symposium at the Edith O'Donnell Institute of Art History

Tue. April 5, 2016

white logo on green square

Joan Holladay and Jeffrey Chipps Smith will present papers and John R. Clarke will moderate discussion at the Diptychs, Triptychs and Polyptychs, from the Middle Ages to Modernity, a symposium hosted by the Edith O'Donnell Institute of Art History. The symposium was co-organized by James Rodriguez (M.A. in Art History, 2007) and will take place April 23, 2016.

UT Antiquities Action Conference: Global Initiatives Towards Cultural Heritage Preservation: Who Owns the Past? program

Mon. March 14, 2016

egyptian statue with gold warning lable
Photo source: ARCA/Tsirogiannis. Design by D C Trein.

Global Initiatives Towards Cultural Heritage Preservation: Who Owns the Past?

A UT Antiquities Action conference will take place April 2, 2016 and feature keynote speaker Salam al-Kuntar from the University of Pennsylvania. This conference is sponsored by Middle East Studies, Department of Classics and Department of Art and Art History.

8:30 a.m.
Coffee

9 a.m.
Sterling Wright (The University of Texas at Austin)

Socialist Archaeology: Is It Worth Saving?
The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia is a country that resides just north of Greece. Following World War II, the country became one of the constituent republics of Yugoslavia. The government for this new country was based on what many scholars refer to as Marxism and socialism. Today, the general public in Macedonia disapproves this socio-political policy. In light of this, many have felt that the country should destroy all “archaeological remains” that have been associated with socialism. However, there is also a growing number of people in Macedonia to reevaluate this sort of action. They feel that even though their socialist history was a dark period, it is still part of their cultural identity. This presentation looks into the developments of socialist archaeology in Macedonia.

9:30 a.m.
Dr. Nathan Elkins (Baylor University)

Saving Our Past: The Centrality of the Trade in Ancient Coins
When we think about the illicit antiquities trade, we tend to focus on statues, sarcophagi, Greek vases, and other “monumental” objects. But the trade in “minor antiquities,” and especially in ancient coins, is an integral part of the illicit antiquities trade. Fortunately, in recent years, there has been greater attention paid to the role of the illicit trade in ancient coins. This contribution examines the centrality of the trade in ancient coins in the broader trade in Mediterranean antiquities, sourcing practices for the trade, the scale of the trade, and legal challenges mounted by coin dealers and their lobbyist.

10 a.m.
Dr. Susan Benton-Bruning (Southern Methodist University)

From Pueblo to Paris: The International Trade in Indigenous Cultural Objects
Abstract coming soon...

10:30 a.m.
Dr. David Stuart (The University of Texas at Austin)

The Looting of La Corona: A Case Study of Destruction, Archaeology and Preservation at an Ancient Maya Center
In the late 1960s a group of related sculptures and text fragments came to the attention of scholars, all looted from an unknown Maya ruin designated as “Site Q.” Epigraphic studies of these inscriptions revealed the outlines of royal history from this unidentified site, which evidently had close associations with other powerful Maya kingdoms during the 7th and 8th centuries. In 1997, the initial discovery and documentation of the ruins of La Corona revealed it to be the likely origin of nearly all of the Site Q materials. Archaeological investigations at La Corona since 2005 have uncovered many more sculptures, some parts of monuments looted decades ago. Efforts are now underway to restore La Corona’s monuments, merging data from both excavations and from collections, giving hope to what had once been a hopeless example of site destruction.

11 a.m.
Dr. Dale Correa (The University of Texas at Austin)

Writing Manuscripts into Cultural Heritage Preservation: The Role of Western Scholars in the Recovery of Knowledge
Often overlooked in cultural heritage preservation discourse, handwritten and print materials frequently meet a similar fate to that of art and architecture in conflict areas. In the mid-1990s, the Bosnian Manuscript In-Gathering Project sought to recover materials that had been destroyed or damaged during the war in the former Yugoslavia by asking researchers to contribute the copies of manuscripts and archival documents that they had procured in previous years. Taking cues from this project and others, the Aleppo Recovery Archive addresses the destruction of written cultural heritage in Aleppo, Syria, through strategic archiving of materials acquired by researchers before the onset of conflict. This project not only involves collaboration with scholars locally in Syria and internationally, but also challenges approaches to preservation, access and cultural patrimony in the context of the Middle East. It is hoped that the fruits of Western scholars’ privileged access and acquisition during fieldwork will help to recover some of what has been lost forever in Aleppo.

Noon – 1 p.m.
Lunch

1 p.m.
Nicole Payntar (The University of Texas at Austin)

Local Identities in Global Contexts: Examining the Effects of Cultural Heritage Destruction in Conflict Zones
The recent surge in cultural heritage destruction and antiquities trafficking in Syria is occurring at an unprecedented rate. With most Western media outlets focusing their attention on high profile instances of heritage destruction at the hands of Da’esh, damage to archaeological sites by additional operatives in the country continues to be under reported. The sustained looting and trafficking of antiquities constitutes an irreparable loss of regional knowledge and presents adverse impacts on local identities. By assessing the damage and destruction of heritage sites by groups across Syria, patterns of social inequality and heritage hierarchy emerge. This paper will examine the consequences of cultural heritage destruction in terms of identity and the perception of regional power. It will also address the significance that cultural heritage may contribute toward rebuilding nations in post-conflict stages.

1:30 p.m.
Dr. Janice Leoshko (The University of Texas at Austin)

On the Invention of Heritage
In hindsight the many ensuing tragedies resulting from the events of September 11, 2001 are spectacularly foregrounded by the destruction of the colossal Buddhas at Bamiyan orchestrated by the Taliban in March 2001. This paper seeks to understand what has happened to the “image” of this famous site since that time within perspectives first developed in the insightful volume The Invention of Tradition, edited by Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger (1983). What are the results of the inscription of Bamiyan as a Unesco World Heritage Site in 2003? What is at stake in “heritage production” within museum, academic and political contexts?

2 p.m.
Dr. Salam al-Kuntar (University of Pennsylvania)

Responses to the Destruction of Cultural Heritage in Syria and Iraq: A Critical Appraisal of Current Efforts
The destruction of cultural heritage in the current conflicts in Syria and Iraq is well known to the international heritage community. The common belief is that interventions to protect cultural heritage are extremely difficult to design and implement during conflict, and that both the Syrian and Iraqi crisis are particularly intractable for experts and heritage actors who are seeking to offer their assistance. In this presentation, I provide a critical appraisal of the responses that have been advanced to protect cultural heritage during the crisis to date. I argue that the mobilization of the international community and the varied responses that have been made are hindered by the real difficulty inherent in maintaining a professed rhetoric of universality and neutrality. I also offer some evidence that emergency heritage projects designed to address local needs inside Syria may offer some measure of success and hope for saving heritage and helping the people who are struggling to survive this war.

3 p.m.
Coffee + adjourn

2016 CAA reception and sessions to note

Mon. January 25, 2016

image of washington monument with orange flowers in foreground

Join the Department of Art and Art History reception and meet fellow alumni, students, and faculty. The reception will be held Friday, February 5, from 5:30 – 7 p.m. at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel. Bookmark sessions that including faculty, students or alumni listed below. See the full schedule at collegeart.org.

Wednesday, February 3

The Artist-Critic: History, Identity, Work
9:30 a.m. – noon
No Destination: Regina Rex’s Consensus, Katie Geha, Ph.D. in Art History, 2012, currently at Dodd Galleries, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia

CAA Promotion and Tenure Guidelines For Design Faculty
12:30 – 2 p.m.
Carma Gorman, assistant chair and associate professor of Design

The Language Of Fame and Failure In The Renaissance
2:30 – 5 p.m.
Chair: Jeffrey Chipps Smith, Kay Fortson Chair in European Art

The Art Of Assembly: Urban Space and Crowd Control In The Middle Ages
2:30 – 5 p.m.
Chair: Gillian B. Elliott, Ph.D. in Art History, 2005, currently at the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design

The Modernities Of French Art and Its History, 1780 To The Present
2:30 – 5 p.m.
French Art at the End of Modernism: The Case of Supports/Surfaces, Allison Myers, M.A. in Art History, 2009, Ph.D. candidate in Art History

Thursday, February 4

Everything Disappears
9:30 a.m. – noon
Co-Chair: Alexander Dumbadze, M.A. and Ph.D. in Art History, 1999/2005, currently at The George Washington University

Why Review?
9:30 a.m. – noon
Discussant: David Raskin, Ph.D. in Art History, 1999, currently at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Without Borders: The Promise and Pitfalls of Inter-American Art History
2:30 – 5 p.m.
Co-Chair: Breanne Roberston, M.A. in Art History, 2005, currently at American University

Out Of Time and Out Of Place: Comparative Approaches In Art History
2:30 – 5 p.m.
Between Reality and Transcendence: Byzantine Modernism in the Mid-Twentieth Century, Jessamine Batario, M.A. in Art History, 2012, Ph.D. candidate in Art History

Another 5x5: Mining the DC Area’s Distinct Culture
2:30 – 5 p.m.
Co-Chair: Zoe Charlton, M.F.A. in Studio Art, 1999, currently at American University

Pacific Standard Time North: San Francisco Art, 1960 -1980
5:30 – 7 p.m.
Visualizing Political Prisoners in Third World San Francisco, Tatiana Reinoza, M.A. in Art History, 2009, Ph.D. in Art History

Art and Citizenship in Contemporary Social Practice
5:30 – 7 p.m.
Panelist: Erin Duganne, M.A. and Ph.D. in Art History, 1997/2004, part of Borderland Collective

Friday, February 5

Housework: Contemporary Art and the Domestic
9:30 – noon
The Inseparable Connectivity of It all: Amanda Ross-Ho’s White Goddesses and Vintage Macramé Books, Susan E. Richmond, M.A and Ph.D. in Art History 1995/2002, currently at Georgia State University

Before the Selfie: Promoting the Creative Self in Early Modern Northern Europe
12:30 – 2 p.m.
Bavarian Apelles: Hans Wertinger’s Inserted Self-Portrait from the Landschut Court of Ludwig X., Catharine Ingersoll, M.A. and Ph.D. in Art History, 2009/2014, currently at Virginia Military Institute

Female Piety and Visual Culture in the Late Medieval and Early Modern Hispanic World
2:30 – 5 p.m.
Chair: Cristina C. Gonźalez, M.A. in Art History, 1999, currently at Oklahoma State University

Controversy, Censorship, and Conundrums: Finding Connections in Teaching
5:30 – 7 p.m.
Co-Chair: Ruth Stanford, B.F.A. in Studio Art, 2000, currently at Georgia State University

Publishing in European Postwar and Contemporary Art: New Prospects in Research and Translation
5:30 – 7 p.m.
Rewriting the Arts in France since 1945, Catherine Dossin, Ph.D. in Art History 2008, currently at Purdue University

Department of Art and Art History, UT Austin Reception
5:30 – 7 p.m.
Department of Art and Art History alumni, faculty, and students are invited to a reception at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel, Park Tower Suite 8219, Lobby Level.

Saturday, February 6

Copy That: Painted Replicas and Repetitions before the Age of Appropriation
9:30 a.m. – noon
Chair: Valerie L. Hellstein, M.A. in Art History, 2001, currently at The Willem de Kooning Foundation

Formalism Before Clement Greenberg – Part II
2:30 – 5 p.m.
Discussant: Richard Shiff, Effie Marie Cain Regents Chair in Art, Professor of Art History

Aesthetics of Displacement: The Graphic Evidence
2:30 – 5 p.m.
The Moon Reader: Touch in Translation, Teresa Jaynes, B.F.A. in Studio Art, 1980, currently artist-in-resident at The Library Company of Philadelphia

 

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