Department of Art and Art History Design

Rising sophomores look back on their first year at UT Austin

Wed. May 20, 2015

print of octagonal 3D forms in beige fog
Guneez Ibrahim, Baucis, 2015, digital print.

"My favorite thing about UT Austin thus far is the size of the Department of Art and Art History. By the end of the year, all the freshmen faces become recognizable, and it begins to feel like a small Twin Peaks-esque town."

Guneez Ibrahim (BFA candidate in Design)


people sit for photo beside sawdust design on street
Alfombra built by students and faculty during Holy Week in Guatemala

"My favorite experience from this year has definitely been going on the Holy Week trip to Antigua, Guatemala. On our second day there, we were on a walking tour of the town, and we walked past a shop playing Livin' On A Prayer by Bon Jovi.

I said, "Bon Jovi?"

Jason Urban turned around and said, "That's basically our life this week."

So, even though his comment didn't make perfect sense to everyone that heard him, one of the themes of our week became livin' on a prayer for sure."

— Kendall Bradley (BFA candidate in Studio Art)


student in blue button up posing for camera with sketchpad
Abbie Weller inside the BOT Greenhouse

"My favorite experience during my first year at UT Austin was visiting the BOT Greenhouse with my drawing foundations class to sketch. The light was really beautiful in the early spring, and it was nice to discover a new part of campus."

Abbie Weller (BA candidate in Art History)


photography of orrange and green shapes
Seth Murchinson, Knossos, 2015, photography.

“One of the best things about coming to UT Austin is being able to interact with people in all disciplines. It really helps you to approach your own studies from a unique perspective.”

— Seth Murchison (BFA candidate in Studio Art)


woman with asymmetrical hairstyle posing for photograph
Image courtesy of Madalin Beavers.

"Probably my weirdest, yet funniest, experience during my first year was when I was walking back to my dorm late at night and came upon two guys trying to film a skate video in a street intersection. The guy being filmed was very slowly going across the intersection while the other guy was clumsily skating in front of him and filming. Both of them were wearing sunglasses, khaki shorts, weird hats, dress shirts, and ties — and looked barely conscious."

Madalin Beavers (BFA candidate in Visual Art Studies)

Students showcase products, art, and arguments during Research Week

Thu. April 30, 2015

people stand around posters in large ballroom
The 2015 Longhorn Research Bazaar took place on April 22 in the Texas Union Ballroom.

From community-based social design to art exhibitions, symposia, and ethics in art education, department undergraduate students demonstrate the importance of research in Art Education, Art History, Design, and Studio Art.

Students presented projects and artwork during Research Week alongside colleagues across campus. Events included an exhibition of visual art for the duration of the week, presentations at the Longhorn Research Bazaar, and the Undergraduate Art History Research Symposium.

Third year Design students Alexandra Mann and Cassidy Reynolds presented sparkbuddy, a website that enables children to set health goals and connect with other children with similar goals.

“We probably spent around 75% of the semester researching and 25% of the semester formally designing,” described Alexandra Mann. “Good design is well informed within the context of each project. Its not possible to go through the full design process without gaining an in depth understanding of the ‘who, what, where, when, and how’ of your project.”

three women pose for picture in front of poster
Students present projects at the Longhorn Research Bazaar. From left to right: Jacky Cardenas, Natalie Gomez, and Chelsea Chang

Natalie Gomez, Visual Art Studies undergraduate, presented a group research project entitled, Speak up! Should artistic expression in art education receive the same degree of legal protection as other types of freedom of expression?

When asked about the impetus for the research topic, Natalie Gomez explained, “It was an issue that we felt would be extremely beneficial to us and our peers as artists and future art educators.”

On Friday, April 24, seven Art History seniors presented their honors theses papers at the third annual Undergraduate Art History Research Symposium. The event celebrated the end of an intense semester spent writing a thesis paper alongside the students’ normal coursework. Art History senior Tracey Borders presented a paper entitled, Urbi et Orbi: Politics and Patronage in the Papacy of Boniface VIII.

people in raised auditorium listening to woman present with presentation
Tracey Borders presents in front of full room.

“This process has helped me grow as an art historian and as a person,” said Tracey Borders. “It has been one of the most challenging experiences but entirely worth it. I hope to get involved in government after graduation, and the tools I have acquired through the research and writing of my thesis will be extremely useful for the career path I hope to pursue in Texas politics.”

The university’s Office of Undergraduate Research organizes Research Week every year with the School of Undergraduate Studies and the Senate of College Councils. Each year, Department of Art and Art History students participate in this university event and proudly present work resulting from hours spent in the studio, library, and in the community.

“There is no ‘education’ without research,” Natalie Gomez remarked. “Research is essentially a thorough inquiry and that skill is required of all students entering any profession.”

Alumna Rachel Simone Weil collaborates with Rhizome

Fri. April 24, 2015

TAGS
white overlapping hexagonal and cube shapes on green background

Founder of FEMICOM Museum, Rachel Simone Weil (MFA in Design, 2014) works with Rhizome to preserve work by Theresa Duncan. The project and work was featured in artnet news.

Associate Professor Carma Gorman lectures at Interrogation intellectual property rights: fashion and design conference

Fri. April 24, 2015

white overlapping hexagonal and cube shapes on green background

Carma Gorman presents a lecture entitled, Why post-war American businesses embraced corporate identity design, at the University of Leeds. The lecture is part of the conference, Interrogating Intellectual Property Rights in Fashion and Design on June 12, 2015.

Alumni Spotlight: Adrian Parsons, BFA in Design, 2010

Wed. April 29, 2015

man in blue plaid shirt posting for portrait

Gloria Lee: It's been a long time! I will confess that I occasionally do check in on people via social media networks (yes, lame non-FB-embracer I am) and so I was really happy to learn of your move to New York and your design evolution these past five years. I last worked with you during your senior year, when you were working with both Donoho Designs and League of Technical Voters — both tech-oriented internships and rather radical for design students at the time.

How did your experience in the undergraduate program lead you to both those internships, and what relevancy does your experience as a student relate to your current position now?

Adrian Parsons: The program was really open to me following my curiosity and asking questions about the design of governments and constitutions. That investigation and research led me to discover the League of Technical Voters. I needed an internship to graduate, so I cold-emailed their founder and asked if they needed a designer. It was a slightly sneaky way to get involved in something I care about: "I'll make things pretty for you!" I ended up helping them create a coherent story about how they wanted the government to change — and I got to present it at SXSW, which was really cool!

One of my senior year projects involved designs for an iPhone app. The iPhone was really new at the time, but the design instructors were enthusiastic about integrating new technology and new kinds of interactions into our work. That project led me to working on an iPhone app at Donoho Design Group. When I moved to New York, the app we released at DDG served as a primary portfolio piece while I was job hunting.

One of the more useful things I learned as a student was how to work creatively with a group of people to solve a problem. I came out of school thinking everyone knew how to do this, but it's a rare and valuable skill. The critical thinking skills I developed and the ability to ask fundamental questions like: Why are we doing this? What are we trying to achieve? — are hugely important. In addition, the ability to see the possibilities in a situation — to look beyond the obvious and to question assumptions — is something I use every day. The mindset of embracing process over outcomes hasn't filtered into many communities and is one of the most important things I learned.

GL: Have there been any major changes or constants in your methods of practice over the years?

AP:
I've really expanded my technical expertise (most of my day is now spent writing code). I love the problem solving aspect of it but also the power that comes with being able to build digital services from end to end. The creative potentials are endless.

From a design perspective, the thing that has surprised me about the workflow in startups is speed. We deploy changes to Meetup.com multiple times a day. We can iterate incredibly quickly. The other surprise is data, and how it informs the design process. We have 20 million users at Meetup, and about 1 million visitors to the site every day. We do a ton of split testing (A/B testing), and our design decisions are informed by patterns we see in these millions of interactions. It also makes testing very low-risk. If you have a crazy hunch that something would work better a different way, you can deploy it as a test to a few thousand users, get immediate feedback in the form of behavior and data, and iterate on it until you've confirmed or denied your theory.

GL: It sounds like you have found a really interesting way to start a 'side-project' with Orbital Boot Camp. Can you tell me more about your project, and also why you choose to go with Orbital — what was appealing (and different) about this think-tank/accelerator (I know, they really aren't an accelerator in the commercialization sense)?

AP: Absolutely. We're not sure what to call it either. "Pre-accelerator" is somewhat accurate, but it's hard to pin down. I had heard of orbital through friends — but it was ultimately a blog post by Fred Wilson (co-founder of Union Square Ventures) that convinced me to apply.

Gary Chou, the founder of Orbital, is really well regarded in the tech community. He's friends with John Kolko of the Austin Center for Design and an advisor there. Gary teaches Entrepreneurial Design, an MFA course at SVA in New York. We share a lot of the same values, and his deep understanding of the intersection of design, technology, and entrepreneurship is compelling.

My project is called The Lazy Philanthropist, and its an easy way to donate regularly to nonprofits. I found myself wanting to donate regularly, but not knowing where to donate (and not wanting to do the research to find out). I also found the process of donating — especially in smaller amounts — unfulfilling. I assumed other people had the same desire, so I created a subscription donation service. I'm still developing it, but it's been a really fun project and I've learned a lot from it.

GL: Any advice you would give to the undergraduates in the Design program, and in particular to the seniors?

AP: I never thought I'd say this, but it's been incredibly valuable to work in the business world, especially the technology sector. Partially because the landscape is shifting so quickly, but partially because the values and the working methods of the sector are so smart. You can have a lot of positive effect on people's lives and still make money.

Overall, I've had a lot of success working with people who are smarter than me. When I say smarter, I don't necessarily mean raw intelligence, but smarter in a particular skill or category. One of my colleagues at Meetup has an uncanny ability to distill difficult technical details down to important and actionable facts for engineers and non-engineers alike. Some people are incredibly good at conducting user interviews, motivating teams of people, generating press coverage, etc.

As far as overall career advice, I think it's important to understand and utilize your networks (and to facilitate new ones). You have a built-in network with the Design program, which will help a lot when you graduate (in New York, UT Austin Design alumni meet about once a month). Additionally, I went to a lot of tech Meetups when I lived in Austin and after I moved to New York. People I met at those events are still good friends, and have had a huge impact on my career. More than that, though, I've been able to find "my people", the people who care about the same things I do and who deal with the same problems. My network is great for my career, but it's even better for my creative growth.

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