Department of Art and Art History Design

Broadsides by Design sophomore selected for UT Poetry Center CantoMundo Poetry Reading

Wed. April 1, 2015

poem formated next to drawing of fist holding red strings

Broadsides created by Design sophomores have been selected for UT Poetry Center's CantoMundo reading. Copies of the Broadsides will be available at the reading on April 23, 2015 at 6 pm at the PCL.

Design by Nora Greene receives honorable mention in Maine Animal Coalition competition

Wed. April 1, 2015

circle made of double helix in yellow on blue background
Image courtesy of Nora Greene

Work by Design sophomore Nora Greene received an honorable mention in a competition by Maine Animal Coalition. Greene describes her thinking:

The animal rights movement spans a multitude of issues and animals. From animal agriculture to animal testing and habitat destruction, I found it difficult to represent all aspects and animals of this movement. In order to represent equality in al
l of these areas I decided to try and represent them abstractly. To express equality I used the Human Rights Campaign flag colors to imply equality across species, and symbolized animals through the DNA helix, representing an equality for all life. I composed the double helix into a circle in order to represent longevity and unity for the animal rights movement.

Alumna Rachel Simone Weil curated Hardware Not Responding, on view at the Fine Arts Library

Sat. March 28, 2015

text on top of gradient iamge of old NES nintendo control
 

Rachel Simone Weil (MFA in Design, 2014) curated the exhibition Hardware Not Responding. The exhibition will be on view at the Fine Arts Library March 27 – May 1, 2015. An opening reception will be held Wednesday, April 1, at 5 pm in the Fine Arts Library.

While its earliest videogame consoles are not well known in the US, Sega made an impact with its third entry into the console market, the Sega Genesis. The Genesis became a runaway hit and fast rival to Nintendo in the late 1980s and early 1990s, built on the slogan that “Genesis Does What Nintendon’t.” In the early 1990s, Sega and Nintendo battled for the top spot in the game console market, and it seemed likely that Sega—with sizable game sales and fan following—would come out ahead.

Yet just a few years later, Sega would be plagued by missteps and poor reception to its next-generation game console releases. The Sega Dreamcast, released in the US in 1999, would be Sega’s final videogame console before refocusing its business on arcade machines and game software.

Hardware Not Responding playfully asks the viewer to consider whether history could have been different for Sega and for videogame consoles today. Were some ideas underdeveloped? Too cumbersome? Or perhaps too ahead of their time?

Hardware Not Responding is curated by Rachel Simone Weil with support from the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History and the Fine Arts Library. Display items are on loan from the UT Videogame Archive and from the FEMICOM Museum.
 

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