Department of Art and Art History Exhibition

Natalie Anciso participates in group exhibition at the National Museum of Mexican Art

Mon. May 4, 2015

white overlapping hexagonal and cube shapes on green background
 

Natalie Anciso (BA in Studio Art, 2008) exhibits work in The House on Mango Street: Artists Interpret Community at the National Museum of Mexican Art. The exhibition will be on view  April 17 – August 23, 2015.

Rachel Stuckey presents work in solo exhibition at Hello Project Gallery

Mon. May 4, 2015

blue flowers blooming in woodes
Image courtesy of the artist.

Rachel Stuckey (MFA candidate in Studio Art) presents her first solo exhibition at Hello Project Gallery. The exhibition, It Takes All Sorts, will be on view April 24 – May 23, 2015.

Art and Art History Collection provides distinctive research resource

Thu. April 30, 2015

image of brown ceramic vase on black background
Birds and chili pepper imagery on a Chimu culture stirrup-spout ceramic black-ware bottle dating to the Late Intermediate Period (900-1470 CE).

Imagine holding a ceramic vase thousands of years old. The only thing between this 1000-year-old artifact and your skin are the white museum gloves your professor gave you at the beginning of class.

“For a well-rounded education it is important that students have the opportunity to engage in multiple modes of inquiry,” remarked Dr. Astrid Runggaldier, lecturer in the Department of Art and Art History. “Especially in this digital age, working with objects like the artifacts gives students the chance to acquire skills and knowledge through analytical and creative processes that put them directly in touch — literally — with the material they are studying.”

In her course Art and Archaeology of Ancient Peru, Runggaldier utilized the Art and Art History Collection and allowed the students to handle the objects. Students learned to formally analyze artifacts and then wrote final papers focused on the art historical and cultural context of a chosen piece.

“The collection's highlights include valuable textiles from the American Southwest and pottery from the Pre-Columbian Andean cultures, but the sheer range of materials, as well as the breadth of cultures and time periods represented in our holdings offer extensive opportunities for coursework and independent student work,” described Runggaldier.

The collection has had a long history at The University of Texas at Austin. The Texas Memorial Museum (TMM) acquired contributions as early at the 1930s. Over 60 years, TMM received contributions of ceramic, metal, stone, textile, and wood objects from Central and South America as well as smaller collections from Central Africa and the American Southwest.

open vase with mand and flower motif
Profile heads and cactus flowers on a Tiwanaku culture ceramic qero (drinking vessel), dating to the Middle Horizon (600-1000 CE).

“This is one of the most significant collections on campus, and the department was critical in saving the collection when it was deaccessioned from the Texas Memorial Museum in 2005,” said Department of Art and Art History Chair, Jack Risley. “Now our challenge is to find a long term home for these objects, where they will receive proper archival stewardship and be easily accessible for study and research.”

Recently, objects from the collection were included in Between Mountains and Sea: Arts of the Ancient Andes at the Blanton Museum of Art. The exhibition was guest curated by Dr. Kimberly L. Jones (PhD in Art History, 2010). In 2013, Dr. Jones was appointed the Assistant Curator of the Arts of the Americas at the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA). In an upcoming DMA exhibition, Inca: Conquests of the Andes, seven works from the collection will be on view. Inca: Conquest of the Andes opens May 15, 2015. Pieces from the collection are also on view in the UT Austin Fine Arts Library and the the College of Fine Arts Dean's Office. Both are located in the E. William Doty Fine Arts Building.

“Beyond, their use to the campus community, these are important objects for the wider public to know about,” said Runggaldier. “Their recent inclusion in museum shows in Austin and Dallas is a positive development that I hope to see more of.”

Assistant Professor Jeff Williams' exhibition is what is reviewed by Glasstire

Fri. April 24, 2015

metal sheet with green fuzz hanging on hallway wall
Photo: Sandy Carson

is what is, on view at The Courtyard Gallery through May 2, 2015, features work by Jeff Williams. The exhibition was recently reviewed by Glasstire.

Solo Exhibition of work by Ian Pedio, MFA Studio Art 2002

Fri. April 24, 2015

two digital photographs overlapped and transparent
Image courtesy of the artist

Ian Pedigo (MFA in Studio Art, 2002) presents work in The Arrows Like Soft Moon Beams, his fourth solo exhibition at 65Grand in Chicago. The exhibition will be on view April 17 – May 23, 2015.

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