Department of Art and Art History Graduate Students

Ryan Hawk interviewed on Big Red and Shiny

Mon. December 7, 2015

white hexagonal and cube outline on green background
 

Ryan Hawk, M.F.A. candidate in Studio Art, was interviewed on Big Red and Shiny about Traveling Fellowship award and plans.

Design Institute for Health Research Fellowships available to M.F.A. Design students in fall 2016

Tue. December 1, 2015

night image of burnt orange tower
Photo by Marsha Miller.

The College of Fine Arts at The University of Texas at Austin announces two Design Institute for Health Research Fellowships open to graduate students entering the M.F.A. Design program in the Department of Art and Art History in fall 2016. Fellowship awards include:

  • Full tuition and health insurance
  • Fellowship/work stipend of $25,000 per year
  • The opportunity to work with the university's Design Institute for Health, a collaboration between the Dell Medical School and College of Fine Arts

Applicants to the M.F.A. Design program whose backgrounds and statements of intent suggest an interest in and aptitude for the field of healthcare design (broadly conceived to include the design of systems, services, devices and interactions) will automatically be considered for the fellowships; no separate application is required.

About the Department of Art and Art History
The Department of Art and Art History in the College of Fine Arts at The University of Texas at Austin is one of the largest and most diverse in the country. It includes programs in Art Education, Art History, Design and Studio Art. The M.F.A. Design program’s cohorts of four to seven students work closely with faculty in small classes with individualized instruction. Drawing on the extensive resources of a tier one, comprehensive research university, the program allows self-directed students the opportunity to tailor their coursework to pursue an area of academic concentration and to focus on graphics, objects, interactions, systems and/or services.

About the Design Institute for Health
The Design Institute for Health (DIH) is a first-of-its-kind initiative applying a creative design-based approach to the nation’s health care challenges and rapidly integrating that perspective into medical education and new community health programs in Central Texas. The DIH is a collaboration between the Dell Medical School and College of Fine Arts at The University of Texas at Austin and is a resource to the community. The DIH works across Austin’s new medical district with invested stakeholders on projects to meaningfully change health experiences and reimagine care delivery. The institute is led by two veterans of the internationally recognized design firm IDEO: Stacey Chang, IDEO’s former managing director of health and wellness; and Beto Lopez, former head of systems design at IDEO and a UT Austin alumnus.
 

Q+A with Eugenie Scrase, Royal College of Art exchange student in Sculpture

Tue. November 24, 2015

screen shot of video of dog
Image still from Powdercoat Footprint/Kevin and Dylan, 2014. Image courtesy of the artist.

What has been the most surprising experience of your time in Austin so far?

Eugenie Scrase: I was surprised to see so many people riding bikes around Austin. As an ardent cyclist back in London I was so happy to see such a strong love for it here in Austin too. I had never seen bike racks on the front of buses either (not even in Copenhagen!); I’ll be pushing that idea onto the mayor of London when I get back to the UK!

In your work, which media do you find yourself working with most? Why do these fit your practices best?

ES: I mostly work in sculpture and film. The metal workshop in the Department of Art and Art History is brilliant—as are the technicians there. I’ve just come back from a week long road trip across Texas over to White Sands National Preserve in New Mexico. Along the way I chose particular locations to shoot some film footage that I’m now editing.

Writing plays a huge role in my practice. Along with drawing, it enables me to percolate thoughts and ideas.

screen shot of video of person's foot with yellow painted footprints
Image still from Powdercoat Footprint/Kevin and Dylan, 2014. Image courtesy of the artist.

Would you describe the themes that you work with? What drives your interest in them?

ES: I often use the term ‘Haptic Visuality’ or ‘Hapicity’ to describe my practice. It is sensuous imagery that evokes memory of the senses (i.e. water, nature); depicting acute states of sensory activity (smelling, sniffing, tasting, etc.). The haptic
image is in a sense, ‘less complete’, requiring the viewer to contemplate the image as a material presence rather than an easily identifiable representational cog in a narrative wheel.

This has stemmed from my previous research into the Phenomenology of Landscape—our perceptions of landscape and our movement within it.

As part of the UT < > RCA exchange program, you will present an exhibition. When and where will your exhibition be on view?

ES: It’s going to be in one of the Long Horn Stadium Squash Courts. I’m immensely excited to have to opportunity to be showing work in a space so heavily associated with the human body. There are some stunning marks on the court’s walls made by the contact of ricocheting squash balls. The date hasn’t been set yet. I’m anticipating it opening in the first week of December.

Q+A with Meghan Rubenstein (Ph.D in Art History, expected December 2015)

Thu. October 29, 2015

woman in glasses with hair up poses for photo
 

Meghan Rubenstein is a Ph.D. candidate in Art History, expected graduation in December 2015. She answered questions over email.

Posts you wrote while doing research in Mexico are being published on a new website organized by the Program for the Art of the Ancient Americas at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). How did you get involved in this initiative?

Meghan Rubenstein: Last year a curator at LACMA contacted Julia Guernsey, my dissertation co-advisor, looking for individuals willing to share their research in Latin America with a broader audience. The concept behind the new Ancient Americas blog was to expose readers to the research process rather than just the results. Since I had recently returned from a year of fieldwork in Mexico, Julia suggested I contribute to this project. I contacted LACMA with a summary of my research and potential blog topics, and when the website launched earlier this year I was invited to write a series of posts on my work.

These particular posts document your initial fieldwork in 2012. How did your research evolve to your final thesis topic?

MR: Living in Mexico gave me access to an entirely different set of resources than I had in Texas. Not only was I able to meet with and work alongside a number of scholars in my field, I read archaeological reports and theses housed within the local archives and libraries. The combination of conversations and exposure to new data ultimately helped refine my project and more fully engage with the material. I originally intended to produce in-depth studies on several buildings at Kabah. Yet when I realized how much data was being unearthed at the Codz Pop, I made this structure my primary case study. While focusing on a single building seems narrow, it allowed me to explore the structure and its socio-political function in greater depth. Considering how it related to other examples nearby and afar also forced me to think more broadly about the cultural meaning of architecture throughout the world.

What attracted you to your current position at Colorado College? What does your average workday look like?

MR: When I started looking for jobs, I didn’t have an ideal position in mind. I was hoping to land in a place that would allow me to be creative, productive and continue my own research. When I saw the job description for the position at Colorado College, I felt like it was written for me. Colorado College is a small school with a combined Studio and Art History program, and they were looking for someone who could work closely with students and faculty to support their research and teaching needs. In addition to my background in art history, I have a love for technology, an undergraduate degree in studio art, and several years experience working in the field of Visual Resources. It was a good fit. Also, Colorado is beautiful.

There is no average work day for me. That is one of the reasons I was attracted to this position. Colorado College is on the block plan, so students take—and instructors teach—one class at a time. What that means for me is that every four weeks is like the start of a new semester. In addition to maintaining and growing the department’s image collection, I brainstorm ways students and faculty can effectively incorporate visual resources into their classrooms and scholarship, which involves researching new instructional technologies and providing training to our department.

Do you have upcoming projects or research travel you're particularly excited about?

MR: Like most research projects, I started with a single idea and ended up with a hundred new ones that will keep me busy for a while. I have plans to return to Yucatán next summer to continue my research in the Puuc region, as well as potentially join another project that is in the works. I haven’t been back to Mexico in almost two years—and I can’t wait!
 

Jessamine Batario receives $20,000 dissertation fellowship from Dedalus Foundation

Wed. September 30, 2015

woman in blue shirt and slacks poses for picture in front of tree

Jessamine Batario, a doctoral candidate in Art History, has been awarded a $20,000 Dedalus Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for 2015–2016. Batario’s dissertation, “The Art and Intellectual History of Byzantine Modernism,” seeks to establish the significance of a “Byzantine Modern” art history alongside other narratives of modernism and to contribute to the discipline’s recent evaluation of institutional periodization.

Batario received a B.A. in art history from the University of California, Berkeley and a M.A. in Art History from the Department of Art and Art History at The University of Texas at Austin. Her interests lie in 19th century European painting, history of art history, phenomenology and hermeneutics.

Batario’s work focuses on Modern art and critical theory. Her research interests include European and American modernism, Byzantine art, mid-20th century art criticism and history of art history. For two years, she worked as the graduate research assistant for Dr. Richard Shiff in the Center for the Study of Modernism. She has also served the Department of Art and Art History as the Ph.D. co-chair of the Graduate Student Art History Association and the co-chair of the Research Roundtable. Batario also holds a Named/Endowed Continuing Fellowship from the Graduate School at UT Austin.

Founded in 1981 by the artist Robert Motherwell (1915–1991), the Dedalus Foundation fosters public understanding of modern art and modernism through its programs in arts education, research and publications, archives and conservation, and exhibitions, as well as in the guardianship and study of Robert Motherwell’s art.

The Dedalus Foundation Dissertation Fellowship is awarded annually to a Ph.D. candidate at a university in the United States who is working on a dissertation related to painting, sculpture and allied arts from 1940-1970, with a preference shown to Abstract Expressionism.

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