Department of Art and Art History Studio Art

Troy Brauntuch featured in New York Times

Mon. November 16, 2015

Black canvas with faint image of the back of two officers sitting
Image courtesy of the artist.

Troy Brauntuch was featured in New York Times' T magazine in anticipation of his solo exhibition Early Work at Petzel Gallery. Early Work is on view through January 9, 2016. The exhibition has also garnered attention from Time Out New York and The New Yorker.

Tommy Fitzpatrick presents solo exhibition Cat's Cradle

Wed. October 28, 2015

Painting of red architectual structure on warm yellow background
Image courtesy of the artist.

Tommy Fitzgerald's (B.A. in Studio Art, 1991) presents a solo exhibition entitled Cat's Cradle at Inman Gallery in Houston, Texas. Cat's Cradle opens on Friday, October 28, and will be on view through January 2, 2016.

Q+A with Emily Mae Smith (B.F.A. in Studio Art, 2002)

Thu. October 29, 2015

woman standing in front of paintings in gallery
Image courtesy the artist and Laurel Gitlen, New York.

Emily Mae Smith received a B.F.A. in Studio Art from The University of Texas at Austin in 2002. She received an M.F.A. in Visual Art from Columbia University in 2006 and is represented by Laurel Gitlen She answered questions from undergrauduate student, Kayla Jones, via email.

Kaya Jones: Describe your background.

Emily Mae Smith: I grew up in the Texas Hill Country near Fredericksburg. I moved to Austin in 1997 for college and received my B.F.A. in Studio Art from UT Austin in 2002. I moved to New York in 2004 to attend graduate school at Columbia University where I earned my M.F.A. in 2006. I have lived and worked in New York since then. My second solo exhibition in New York held at Laurel Gitlen gallery just closed on October 25. In 2016 my work will be exhibited internationally at galleries in Berlin (Germany), Glasgow (Scotland UK), and Brussels (Belgium). I'm primarily a painter.

painting of a cherry next to ice cube
The Studio (Memento Mori), 2015, oil on linen, 48 x 37 inches. Image courtesy the artist and Laurel Gitlen, New York.

KJ: Congratulations on your solo show Medusa at Laurel Gitlen in New York. In Medusa you show several paintings that reference the early 1900s art publication The Studio. How did you come across this magazine? What about it grabbed your attention and made you want to incorporate it into your work?

EMS: Many of the paintings I made between 2014 and 2015 contained references to Art Nouveau style (popular during 1890-1910). The publication The Studio was a trade magazine for illustrators working at that time. I discovered it through research, and found digitized copies from an online library. I'm fascinated by that time period because a lot of the methods used today in popular visual culture and advertising were invented then. Art Nouveau used images of the female body to sell products, just like today. I have used Art Nouveau and The Studio in my work as a parody of the difficulties and conditions I have faced as an artist. I don't only paint what I like—I paint satire, ideas I want to change, or expose.

yellow painting with mirror surrounded by figures
The Mirror, 2015, oil on linen, 46 x 54 inches. Image courtesy the artist and Laurel Gitlen, New York.

KJ: Your work is beautifully rendered and can sometimes be hard to distinguish from a digitally produced rendering over the internet. Is this effect important to you or connected to the theme of looking that is prevalent in your work?

EMS: Though my paintings are very hand-made, I do not show a lot of brush strokes. My paintings incorporates a lot of smooth gradients of color and isolated images. Like the pop-artists of the 20th century, my painting sensibility is definitely informed by the seductive and manipulative visual cues presented in today's technology and advertising.

KJ: What sort of work or projects are you involved in outside of your studio practice?

EMS: Right now I'm really focused on a full-time studio practice which is totally exhilarating. It took a long time to get to that point. For many years I worked several freelance jobs to make ends meet and support my art making. I worked for artists as an assistant, did art-handling, worked at galleries, and did scenic painting. I taught painting and drawing courses at Columbia University for several years and Vanderbilt University for one semester. I enjoyed teaching and I hope to do more in the future. I attend a lot of New York arts events, gallery openings, and lectures. I support feminist causes and outreach programs for girls and underprivileged youth.

brick wall with opening showing two moons and figure with binoculars
Viewfinder, 2015, oil on linen, 48 x 37 inches. Image courtesy the artist and Laurel Gitlen, New York.

KJ: What made you decide to continue on to get your M.F.A.? What advice would you give others who might be considering graduate programs?

EMS: In undergrad I was very serious about my artwork and knew I wanted to be a working contemporary artist. I was not exactly sure how to achieve that, but I saw some steps to take. I also had good advice from my teachers. I knew that I wanted to live in New York, so attending a graduate program in the city made sense. I also wanted to know a lot more about subjects like feminism, post-modernism, and cultural theory because these would inform my artwork.

My advice is that an M.F.A. is still no guarantee to a path of professionalism because things happen to well-laid plans. For example the great recession struck right after I finished my M.F.A. and I really struggled for a long time through it. Have a passion you would like to mercilessly pursue, and if getting an M.F.A. will aid you in that quest then it makes sense to do.

Kayla Jones lives in Austin, Texas where she is pursuing a B.F.A. in Studio Art and B.A. in English at The University of Texas at Austin.

Ender Martos presents solo exhibition at CAMBIart

Fri. October 23, 2015


Colorful, geometric design of strings stretched across plane
Image courtsey of the artist.

Ender Martos (B.F.A. in Studio Art, 2008) presents work in a solo show entitled Luz y Movimiento at CAMIBAart in Austin, Texas. Luz y Movimiento will be on view through November 7, 2015.

Syndicate content