Department of Art and Art History Undergraduate Students

Ryan Lauderdale presents work in group exhibition at Carroll/Fletcher

Mon. April 25, 2016

sculpture of metal and florescent light in gallery room
flora extrusion/funerary, 2016, rormica, wood, fluorescent light, glass, standoffs, extruded aluminum, hardware, vertical power strip, candle, long-stem rose, 70 x 4 8 x 36 inches. Image courtesy of the artist.

Ryan Lauderdale (B.F.A in Studio Art, B.A. in Art History, 2005) presents work in Dense Mesh, a group exhibition at Carroll/Fletcher in London. The exhibition will be on view April 14 – May 25, 2016.

Xochi Solis presents work in three person exhibition at MASS Gallery

Sat. June 4, 2016

collage of pink, gray, and yellow circular shapes
Image courtesy of the artist and Pele Prints.

Xochi Solis (B.F.A. in Studio Art, 2005) presents work in a three-person exhibition, Extended Technique, at MASS Gallery. The exhibition will be on view April 29 – June 4, 2016.

The Alcalde features Young Bloods exhibition by Center Space Project

Mon. April 25, 2016

group of people smiling in front of wall in gallery
Photo by Jessilee Shipman

The Alcalde, the official publication of the Texas Exes, featured Young Bloods, an exhibition by Center Space Project.

Tyler Tschirhart receives Center for the Study of Ancient Italy Summer Fieldwork Fellowship

Fri. April 29, 2016

man in suit stands in front of greenery and smiles

The Center for the Study of Ancient Italy (CSAI) is pleased to announce Tyler Tschirhart as the recipient of the 2016 CSAI Summer FIeldwork Fellowship. An art history and biochemistry double major, Tyler is a junior who is working on an honors thesis that focuses on renovations of the Horologium Augusti by the Emperors Domitian and Hadrian.

The CSAI fellowship will pay for Tschirhart to travel to Italy and participate in the Oplontis Project May 22 – June 17, 2016. This CSAI excavation project studies two ancient Roman sites at Oplontis, a seaside town destroyed by the same eruption that covered Pompeii. In addition to getting the chance to excavate at Oplontis Villa B, he will work on research projects with the project's directors, Professor John Clarke and Dr. Michael Thomas. This research will include the opportunity to study and catalog wall painting fragments with Professor Clarke and document architectural masonry with Dr. Thomas. This trip will be Tschirhart's first to Italy.

"Last year, I found my calling in art history and quickly fell in love with the the way in which politics shaped the city of Imperial Rome," says Tschirhart.

Tschirhart hopes to go to graduate school in order to earn his Ph.D. in Roman art and architecture. He is also interested in antiquities law and the antiquities market. His hobbies include keeping up with world news and politics, watching movies and television shows, and collecting trivial knowledge.

Haley Parsa, undergraduate in Studio Art, receives UT System Regents' Outstanding Student Award in Arts and Humanities

Sat. April 30, 2016

Haley Parsa, undergraduate in Studio Art, received the 2016 Regents' Outstanding Student Award in Arts and Humanities. Only two students will be awarded across The University of Texas System. Both students will be recognized in May at the U.T. System Board of Regents' meeting.

Parsa’s work covers a large variety of mediums, gliding smoothly between them, never committing entirely to one or the other. The ways in which images or objects are embedded in and experienced within time, histories, bodies and space through repetition and documentation is a point of investigation within Parsa’s work. Repetition negates the passage of time yet each mark, unit, form, is documentation of a repeated action.

As an Iranian-American, her Persian history and her connection with it are placed under an intimate and meditative lens. Parsa challenges the expectation to identify with one culture wholly yet entertain both sides and works to situate herself somewhere in between the two. By embracing the liminality of not belonging to one side or another, Parsa is interested in how things can engage with histories and with space to transform, to become more mysterious and impactful.


Farsi letters written in black in on white paper
You Are My Liver, 2016, lithograph, 25 x 18 inches.

This originated from a reoccurring childhood memory of my grandmother that is carried out to this day. As she only speaks Farsi, almost everything she's ever said has had to be translated to me. She would always say "you are my liver," meaning "you are my life/I cannot live without you." Not only was this phrase funny to me but it was always funny to think I feel completely connected to her even though we've never "spoken" - that I can still be in touch with my family, roots, heritage on a very intimate level despite not knowing Farsi or being "fully" Persian or being Persian "enough." I have struggled to situate and understand my place in my family and myself as an Iranian-American woman.

Aesthetically, the piece employs the same repeated letter technique used when learning a language on a fundamental, elementary level. Each letter of the Farsi alphabet is contained in an organic shape similar to bodily, liver-like parts all composing one unit.

black and white print of abstract shapes
Chromatophores at Your Local Grocery, 2015, hand reduction screenprint, 22 x 15 inches.

I drew inspiration from an unlikely source: the grocery store. I took what appeared to be mangled meat or fish and distorted the image into a more abstract representation while staying true to the present values. It was important to treat each indistinguishable form with the same attention and grace. Each is rendered in a very precise and meticulous way in hand reduction (totaling 7 layers) to make accentuate the 3-Dimensionality of this seemingly grotesque abstracted image that would not normally be warranted this much attention or found as striking and curious.

haleyparsa.com

Syndicate content