Department of Art and Art History News

Lecturer Megan Hildebrandt presents exhibition at LIVESTRONG Foundation

Mon. April 6, 2015

brown, black, and yellow pencil and paint marks on paper
Counting Radiation Series, 2012, graphite and acrylic ink on paper , 96 x 54 inches framed

Lecturer Megan Hildebrandt presents work in an exhibition at the LIVESRONG Foundation, co-presented by Art.Science.Gallery. The show will be on view April 16 – May 30, 2015.

Hildebrandt states:

My works on paper examine autobiography via repetition and ritual. I am interested in creating proof of my existence on paper. A litany of marks that monitor moments and months - I mark time in this work. In Counting Radiation, I process the experience of being diagnosed with and treated for cancer at 25. The rolling landscape of tally marks counts the time spent in chemotherapy and CT scans; my memories put onto paper via abstraction.

Associate Professor Stephennie Mulder was interviewed on RT America

Fri. April 3, 2015

white overlapping hexagonal and cube shapes on green background

Associate Professor Stephennie Mulder was interviewed on RT America about ISIS' destruction of artifacts.

Professor Richard Shiff contributes essay to Alex Katz exhibition

Fri. April 3, 2015

white overlapping hexagonal and cube shapes on green background

An essay by Professor Richard Shiff will be featured in a catalog accompanying the Colby Museum exhibition, Brand-New & Terrific: Alex Katz in the 1950s. The catalog is set to be published in July 2015.

Exhibition by alumnus Erik Parker reviewed in Supertouch

Fri. April 3, 2015

white overlapping hexagonal and cube shapes on green background

Erik Parker's (BFA in Studio Art, 1996) solo exhibition ¿What About Now? at Galeria Javier Lopez was reviewed in Supertouch.

Design by Nora Greene receives honorable mention in Maine Animal Coalition competition

Wed. April 1, 2015

circle made of double helix in yellow on blue background
Image courtesy of Nora Greene

Work by Design sophomore Nora Greene received an honorable mention in a competition by Maine Animal Coalition. Greene describes her thinking:

The animal rights movement spans a multitude of issues and animals. From animal agriculture to animal testing and habitat destruction, I found it difficult to represent all aspects and animals of this movement. In order to represent equality in al
l of these areas I decided to try and represent them abstractly. To express equality I used the Human Rights Campaign flag colors to imply equality across species, and symbolized animals through the DNA helix, representing an equality for all life. I composed the double helix into a circle in order to represent longevity and unity for the animal rights movement.