Department of Art and Art History News

Q+A with Emily Edwards (B.A. in Art History, 2015)

Tue. November 24, 2015

woman in blue blouse poses for picture
Image courtesy of Emily Edwards

Emily Edwards (B.A. in Art History, 2015) is a graduate student at Georgetown University. She answered questions by email.

Margaret Conyngham: After you finished your B.A. in Art History at UT Austin, you were accepted into the Art and Museum Studies graduate program at Georgetown University. What is your research focused on?

Emily Edwards: I am primarily focusing on contemporary art. I am also taking a few curatorial studies courses that focus on exhibition planning.

MC: Congratulations on your internship at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. What kinds of projects have you been working on there?

EE: Thank you! I am currently developing a video podcast for their website. I also work with the curatorial staff on exhibition research for future catalogs.

MC: How did your undergraduate work prepare you for graduate school and the work you are doing at the Hirshhorn?

EE: I learned how to do in-depth research through my undergraduate classes, especially while writing my undergraduate thesis. I really fine-tuned my writing skills in my four years at UT. I also learned how valuable it is to form relationships with professors. They all want to get to know you and help you succeed!

MC: Do you have any advice for students thinking about applying to graduate Art History programs?

EE: My biggest piece of advice is to thoroughly research the graduate programs. I remember thinking one program was perfect but then looked at their course offerings to find they did not offer any contemporary art classes. Since that is the area I want to specialize in, I quickly crossed it off my list! I also advise looking into the programs well in advance of application deadlines. I spent the summer before my senior year drafting a list of the schools I wanted to apply to so I could spend the fall of my senior year actually working on the applications. Those deadlines sneak up faster than you think! Finally, take advantage of the career services available in the department. I had no idea how to write a statement of purpose initially. Visiting career services helped me focus my ideas.

Maggie Conyngham is a recent graduate of The University of Texas at Austin with a B.A. in Art History and French. She currently lives in Austin, Texas.

Q+A with Eugenie Scrase, Royal College of Art exchange student in Sculpture

Tue. November 24, 2015

screen shot of video of dog
Image still from Powdercoat Footprint/Kevin and Dylan, 2014. Image courtesy of the artist.

What has been the most surprising experience of your time in Austin so far?

Eugenie Scrase: I was surprised to see so many people riding bikes around Austin. As an ardent cyclist back in London I was so happy to see such a strong love for it here in Austin too. I had never seen bike racks on the front of buses either (not even in Copenhagen!); I’ll be pushing that idea onto the mayor of London when I get back to the UK!

In your work, which media do you find yourself working with most? Why do these fit your practices best?

ES: I mostly work in sculpture and film. The metal workshop in the Department of Art and Art History is brilliant—as are the technicians there. I’ve just come back from a week long road trip across Texas over to White Sands National Preserve in New Mexico. Along the way I chose particular locations to shoot some film footage that I’m now editing.

Writing plays a huge role in my practice. Along with drawing, it enables me to percolate thoughts and ideas.

screen shot of video of person's foot with yellow painted footprints
Image still from Powdercoat Footprint/Kevin and Dylan, 2014. Image courtesy of the artist.

Would you describe the themes that you work with? What drives your interest in them?

ES: I often use the term ‘Haptic Visuality’ or ‘Hapicity’ to describe my practice. It is sensuous imagery that evokes memory of the senses (i.e. water, nature); depicting acute states of sensory activity (smelling, sniffing, tasting, etc.). The haptic
image is in a sense, ‘less complete’, requiring the viewer to contemplate the image as a material presence rather than an easily identifiable representational cog in a narrative wheel.

This has stemmed from my previous research into the Phenomenology of Landscape—our perceptions of landscape and our movement within it.

As part of the UT < > RCA exchange program, you will present an exhibition. When and where will your exhibition be on view?

ES: It’s going to be in one of the Long Horn Stadium Squash Courts. I’m immensely excited to have to opportunity to be showing work in a space so heavily associated with the human body. There are some stunning marks on the court’s walls made by the contact of ricocheting squash balls. The date hasn’t been set yet. I’m anticipating it opening in the first week of December.

Anna Collette presents exhibition at Hampshire College's Jerome Liebling Center

Fri. November 20, 2015

Dead tree branches in front of gray sky
Image courtesy of the artist.

Professor Anna Collette is featured in a solo exhibition entitled Gathering Ground at Hampshire College's Jerome Liebling Center. Gathering Ground will be on view through December 14.

Rachel Lee Hovnian interviewed by The Art Gorgeous

Fri. November 20, 2015


Woman in front of wall of electric outlets wearing dress of same pattern
Image courtesy of the artist.

Rachel Lee Hovnanian (B.F.A. in Studio Art, 1982) was interviewed by The Art Gorgeous.

Troy Brauntuch featured in New York Times

Mon. November 16, 2015

Black canvas with faint image of the back of two officers sitting
Image courtesy of the artist.

Troy Brauntuch was featured in New York Times' T magazine in anticipation of his solo exhibition Early Work at Petzel Gallery. Early Work is on view through January 9, 2016. The exhibition has also garnered attention from Time Out New York and The New Yorker.