Department of Art and Art History News

Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler present work in exhibitions nationally and internationally

Fri. June 26, 2015

photograph of woman standing and looking out of window
Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler, Giant, 2014, high definition video with sound, duration: 30 minutes, synchronized 3-channel projection, courtesy of Tanya Bonakdar Gallery New York and Lora Reynolds Gallery, Austin.

Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler present work in solo and group exhibitions nationally and internationally this summer. Visit hubbardbirchler.net for more information.

Sound Speed Marker
Blaffer Art Museum
Houston, Texas
May 31 – September 5, 2015

Framing Desire: Photography and Video
The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth
Fort Worth, Texas
February 21 – August 29, 2015

Der entfesselte Raum
Gewerbemuseum
Winterthur, Switzerland
May 10 – October 4, 2015

Go-Betweens: The World seen through Children
Museum of Art
Kochi, Japan
Traveling from the Mori Museum, Tokyo, Japan
April 5 – June 7, 2015

Happy Birthday
Israel Museum
Jerusalem, Israel
May 11, 2015 –- March 1, 2016

The Goetz Collection. 12 Months / 12 Films - Explorations in Space
Museum Folkwang
Essen, Germany
April 17, 2015 – May 1, 2016

Space, Place, Trace: Sturctures of Feeling and Hubbard/Birchler's Giant by Jana La Brasca

Fri. June 26, 2015

white overlapping hexagonal and cube shapes on green background
 

The Ballroom Marfa blog features a paper presented by Jana La Brasca (graduate student in Art History) entitled "Space, Place, Trace: The Structures of Feeling and Hubbard/Birchler's Giant."

Janaye Brown participates as summer resident at Bruce High Quality Foundation University

Fri. June 26, 2015

photo of legs beneath the knee standing in light from door
Image courtesy of the artist.

Janaye Brown (MFA Studio Art, 2013) is a summer resident at the Bruce High Quality Foundation University through August. Stay updated by liking the BHQFU Facebook page.

From the Death of Pachyderm to The Internet of Things: A profile of alumnus Alex Freeman

Thu. June 25, 2015

photograph of man wearing brown jacket in front of structure

“I studied at UT Austin at a very interesting time,” said Alex Freeman (MA in Art Education, 2009). “I saw the rapid advancement of certain mobile and social technologies.”

Originally trained as a painter, Freeman worked as a framer and then as a gallery assistant in Houston before entering the Art Education graduate program.

“After a bit of soul searching, I realized that my favorite part of the position at the gallery was talking to people about the art,” described Freeman.

His thesis focused on the historical importance of art critic Charles Caffin (1854–1918). Freeman explains, “it was the technology and the communication channels Caffin used that were of most interest to me—an idea that still plays out today with artwork via websites, blogs, and social media.”

While a graduate student, Freeman used Pachyderm, a microsite builder which used Flash, to create sites for the collections at Mexic-Arte Museum and The New York Graphic Workshop: 1964–1970 exhibition at the Blanton Museum of Art.

“I thought I had found my marketable niche as a Flash-based museum interpretive designer,” remarked Freeman. “Then the iPhone came out and smashed my dreams because Flash was all but dead when that happened.”

During his time creating Pachyderms and obtaining grants for digital projects, Freeman worked with Rachel Varon (BA in Art History/MA in Art Education, 2002/2007), who worked for the New Media Consortium (NMC). The connection would later result in Freeman’s recruitment into a position with the NMC.

“My work at Mexic-Arte and the Blanton provided me with the opportunity to experiment on digital projects that directly connected my coursework with actual museum practice,” said Freeman. “I don’t think I would have been into creating digital interpretives or using social media as much, had I not had an avenue to see how it worked in the real world.”

With Pachyderm out the door, Freeman was forced to apply his interests and knowledge in a different way to his work at NMC.

“Writing, lecturing, and creating digital assets—skills I gained in grad school—are key to the work that I do now at the NMC on the Horizon Project,” said Freeman. “The NMC Horizon Report > 2015 Museum Edition is a longitudinal study on the trends, challenges, and technology poised to impact teaching and learning over the next year to five years. It has generated a lot of buzz within museums circles.”

Freeman’s NMC report was released at the Smith Symposium at Balboa Park and again at the American Alliance of Museums annual meeting. In addition to releasing the report, Freeman was recently awarded an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian grant to pursue an online continuing professional development course for librarians and was also awarded a national leadership grant valued at $500,000 for a similar project for museums.

Later, Freeman was invited to present the NMC report to the IMLS board of directors. While in Washington D.C. for the IMLS presentation, Freeman was invited to attend an award ceremony at the White House, where Michelle Obama was in attendance.

“She [Mrs. Obama] said we could take the cocktail napkins but needed to leave the silverware,” laughed Freeman.

Eddie Chambers publishes articles in Nka and Afterall Journal

Thu. June 25, 2015

white overlapping hexagonal and cube shapes on green background
 

Eddie Chambers published articles in Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art and Afterall Journal, Issue 39.

The May 2015 issue of Nka results from a 2014 CAA Panel Chambers organized and Rose G. Salseda, PhD candidate in Art History, participated.