Member Spotlight: Suzanne Cavender

 

Suzanne CavenderSuzanne Cavender

Suzanne Cavender has always regretted not majoring in art.

A graduate of The University of Texas at Austin in Interior Design, Suzanne says her mother pushed her toward studies that, as she saw it, would end in a more secure career.

“I’m living vicariously through the students I meet in the College of Fine Arts,” said the San Antonian. “I’m big on finding students to apply to the college, and I love supporting them.”

First and foremost, Suzanne says, she joined the College of Fine Arts Advisory Council in 2008 because she and her husband Rick love UT-Austin.

Although Suzanne herself is not an alumnae of COFA, both her daughters, Courtney and Claire, graduated from the Department of Art and Art History. Suzanne is an arts enthusiast and an independent artist who continues to take classes as frequently as she can, including one recently in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

“I’m trying to get back into my own art, so I’m taking a mixed metals class now,” she said. “This class is like chemistry! It’s so unlike other things I do. It’s fun to take classes like this and learn new things.”

Currently, Suzanne is in the process of remodeling a mid-century ranch-style house into a more contemporary home in Alamo Heights. In preparation for the new home, Suzanne and Rick (and their two pet Chihuahuas) have started a small art collection featuring several Texas artists including Chuck Ramirez, Dan Klepper and James Evans.

“I’ve got a lot of white walls to fill,” she laughed. “We love to support Texas artists.”

Suzanne is very excited about the “edgy, cool” new art coming out of the college, and she loves being a part of a stimulating Advisory Council. She says she is impressed by how competitive COFA has become.

“It’s grown so much since I was at UT,” Suzanne said. “I want people to know that COFA is important.”

For Suzanne, not only does art force people to think outside the box, but it is also brings people together.

“I think the arts are a common language,” she said. “It’s the international means of communication, and without it this world would be very dull.”