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    Policy & Law

    Restoring justice

    By Mason Jones
    Published: Oct. 21, 2011

    Dr. Marilyn Armour, associate professor and director of the Institute for Restorative Justice and Restorative Dialogue, describes restorative justice as “amends-making” between victims and offenders where offenders are held “meaningfully accountable” for their crimes.

    Restorative justice programs work to bring healing to victims and rehabilitation to offenders in ways beyond the traditional criminal justice system.

    The restorative justice course taught in the School of Social Work and cross-listed in the School of Law exposes graduate students to firsthand experiences of victims and offenders.

    In this video, Armour, students and community members describe the restorative justice approach and how it brings healing to everyone involved in victim/offender mediation.

    • Quote 2
      Anne Varco said on Nov. 2, 2011 at 2:02 a.m.
      I am in awe of the possibility for individuals,communities and the nation to think and act differently regarding the complexity of violent behaviors. Restorative Justice is our best hope for a brighter future ~ one that supports information sharing, encourages true understanding and ultimately, potential healing for both the victim and the offender. Thank you, Dr Armour, for your inspirational work in and out of the classroom.
    • Quote 2
      Cultura Bizarra said on Oct. 30, 2011 at 3:01 a.m.
      Restorative Justice is a trend that can change the face of the criminal/victim/community relationships for the better. If empathy develops and meaningful accountability follows, all persons benefit, now and into the future.
    • Quote 2
      Dora robinson said on Oct. 27, 2011 at 9:59 p.m.
      This is so great!! Thanks Marilyn for doing this program May God bless you always!!!!
    • Quote 2
      Rich said on Oct. 27, 2011 at 3:39 p.m.
      From the movie clip and the article, you would never know that Bridges to Life is a prison ministry program. Other Christian organizations having similar impacts on recidivism rates are "Prison Fellowship Ministry", and "Kairos Prison Ministry International". Keep up the good works!
    • Quote 2
      Donna said on Oct. 27, 2011 at 3:31 p.m.
      I received my Master's degree in Dispute Resolution & Conflict Management from a different school (the shame!). Within that program, there are classes for Restorative Justice. It is really quite amazing the changes for both the victim and the criminal. It is wonderful to know this process is coming to light and being used more often...and taught! A long way to go for complete change, but know one ate the elephant in one bite, either. Kuddos to my alma mater!
    • Quote 2
      Grace said on Oct. 27, 2011 at 10:42 a.m.
      What Courts/Counties in Texas are willing to look at alternative sentencing related to addressing crime from a restorative justice perspective? I believe this is the way we should deal with 90% of crimes committed at the time of a person's first offense.
    • Quote 2
      Sue Hoffman said on Oct. 27, 2011 at 9:25 a.m.
      Restorative Justice is a trend that can change the face of the criminal/victim/community relationships for the better. If empathy develops and meaningful accountability follows, all persons benefit, now and into the future.
    • Quote 2
      Nadav said on Oct. 27, 2011 at 2:18 a.m.
      That's a beautiful project. With such recidivism rates, it looks like it really helps the criminals. You can't prevent someone from committing a crime, but this program is definitely a great step towards this goal. Nadav
    • Quote 2
      Deborah Hartman said on Oct. 26, 2011 at 10:14 p.m.
      Wonderful video!! I would love to leave a contact number for anyone interested in learning more! We are always looking for volunteers to get involved first hand!Feel free to call or Email! Deborah Hartman deborah@bridgestolife.org - 512-847-0793
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    Download: Save as .mp4 | Podcast (iTunes)

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