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    Science & Technology

    Fuels from the sun

    By Mason Jones
    Published: Oct. 4, 2011

    Allen Bard, one of the most decorated chemists on the planet, looks to harness the power of sunlight to produce fuels that can substitute for oil.

    Read more in the feature story “Fueled by the sun,” which showcases how Bard’s research is making a huge impact on the world’s need for renewable and cleaner fuels.

    • Quote 2
      bambangvedder said on Oct. 25, 2011 at 10:18 p.m.
      how about we let plants store the sun’s energy for us and then turn plant matter into fuels? Biofuels such as ethanol made from corn and biodiesel made from seeds have already found a place in the energy markets, but they threaten to displace food crops, particularly in developing countries where selling biofuels abroad can be more lucrative than feeding people athome.
    • Quote 2
      Jen said on Oct. 25, 2011 at 6:57 a.m.
      Well, hopefully somebody can find something. Fossil fuels have their place, and really we have like centuries of supply left, but still, it's about time we come up with something more efficient and renewable, if only for the sake of competition to ideally upset, and hopefully even destroy, not likely, the monopolistic behaviors of current energy and fuel suppliers. I mean, currently, anyone can purchase parts, and assemble their own energy production if they want too, however, Hydrogen energy, especially if it can be produced by the individual in sufficient quantities like Biodiesel, solar power, and for some, wind power, we can assure our individual energy independence from those that would seek to monopolize our need for energy and fuel.
    • Quote 2
      Nadav said on Oct. 5, 2011 at 4:34 a.m.
      It's a beautiful project, but the question is, once again, money. If it can't compete with oil, it won't "catch". There is also safety to consider here. Hydrogen is highly combustible, and people will demand a solution to this problem too before putting hydrogen in their cars (or anywhere else near them). Nadav
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