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  • Climate change and food supply: Q&A with Josh Busby

    Climate change and food supply: Q&A with Josh Busby

    By Marjorie Smith
    Published: Dec. 6, 2009

    Josh Busby, assistant professor of public affairs, talks about the implications of climate change on world food supply, as well as the actions he takes to ensure he’s living an eco-friendly life.

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    • Quote 2
      Gina said on Nov. 4, 2010 at 1:57 p.m.
      Once an environmental activist in college, but now another complacent professor.
    • Quote 2
      Alan McKendree said on June 26, 2010 at 1:01 a.m.
      Kris -- 30 seconds' worth of Google research shows that Travis Co. occupies about 990 square miles, and Williamson Co. 1,123. It's easy to calculate that the two total 58.9 billion sq ft, and thus could hold the current world population of 6.5 billion people with 9 sq feet for each person...plenty of room for each person to stand in. The point is that the vast majority of earth's habitable surface is currently unoccupied, but could be occupied if it were economically feasible. And that's not even counting the conservation of surface area resulting from vertical (multi-story) buildings. Land, like all resources, is unlimited for human purposes, and will be best allocated by a free market in which prices reflect current value and guide future use.
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