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Texas Perspectives is a wire-style service produced by The University of Texas at Austin that is intended to provide media outlets with meaningful and thoughtful opinion columns (op-eds) on a variety of topics and current events. Authors are faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications staffers to craft columns that adhere to journalistic best practices and Associated Press style guidelines. The University of Texas at Austin offers these opinion articles for publication at no charge.

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  • Changing Hospital and Health Communication Can Help Contain Ebola and other Diseases

    Changing Hospital and Health Communication Can Help Contain Ebola and other Diseases

    By Matthew S. McGlone & Keri K. Stephens, Associate Professors of Communication Studies
    Published: Oct. 23

    Although the CDC can be commended for its efforts to contain Ebola here and abroad, the effort could be improved if changes to the health and risk communication were made.

    • Quote 2
      Maureen Coffey said on Nov. 8 at 10:54 a.m.
      "enhance the calibration of their judgments" - well, with the scant information (no symptom - no contagion) forthcoming available even to caregivers (not least because the experts on hemorrhagic fevers had been "fired" at the WHO not long before the outbreak, obviously to save some money), judgments are hard to calibrate. Such questionnaires will only make sense if a whole host of items are to be checked like e.g. prior contacts, travel to infested areas etc. And those isolation rooms in Western hospitals may be able to deal with hepatitis cases, but from what I've seen (and that's a few), they will not stand up to an Ebola onslaught where beds and rooms will run out on day one.
  • Health Communication Features

    Sensationalized Ebola Coverage Should Not be Part of the Story
    Sensationalized Ebola Coverage Should Not be Part of the Story
    Journalists should be trained to better understand and report complex health...
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