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  • Mexican manhood and border violence

    Mexican manhood and border violence

    By Christopher Palmer and Christina Murrey
    Christopher Palmer and Christina Murrey
    Published: July 19, 2010

    In this first installment of the “Border Views” video series, Anthropology Professor Cecilia Balli discusses the new models of Mexican manhood and how they contribute to violence. Balli studies the sexual murder of women in Ciudad Juárez, the construction of a border fence and the Mexican anti-drug campaign. She is an award-winning journalist with Texas …

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    • Quote 2
      longtimelonghorn said on Aug. 3, 2011 at 5:33 p.m.
      OK LETS MAKE SOME MONEY ON ANY NON USA CITZENS UNDOCUMENTED PERSONS WITHOUT CRIMINAL HISTORY!!! Anyone who enter America illegally or illegally with a expired visa/ passport, and can show proof of being in the USA for 5years: Lets welcome them with open arms only after doing and passing a criminal background check and charging US Citzen Naturalzation Documentation Processing Fee of $3,000.00 since the have paid no taxes since they have been here. Freedom is worth every cent and to persue better oppertunites!!! Companies hiring or sponsoring non USA citzens must pay a one time fee of $10,000.00 per person. At the end of a 5year working history with that company with proof, that person automatically become a USA citzen after passing a second Homeland Security Background Check and paying a USA citzen Naturalization Documentation Processing Fee. $3000.00 All person with a criminal history or charge must be deported immediately, and charge with a felony and with a permenent no reentry into the USA. Their country charge with a deportation fee of $5.000. Monies collected from this Immigration Reform could be send to improve and update the immagration process, aide in Homeland Security sharing data with to speed up the criminal background checks and help finance and develpe better education and schools on all levels in the USA.
    • Quote 2
      Jesus Rubio said on July 23, 2010 at 2:09 p.m.
      Having been raised on the border, worked in Mexico and married a Mexican national, being mannerly was the masculine sign of a man who although strong always deferred out of respect for gender. Today that notion and tradition no longer exists. "Ya not hay caballeros".
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