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A resource for students at The University of Texas School of Law regarding the on-campus and off-campus application and interview process, as well as news about upcoming career panels and professional development workshops.

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Blask Fellowship for students interning within the Southern District of Texas – Applications due May 8, 2015

Grants up to $3,000 are available for a limited number of law students who serve as legal interns for a minimum of six weeks during the summer of 2015 in the offices of a federal court or agency located within the Southern District of Texas, including but not limited to the following:

  • U.S. District Court
  • U.S. Bankruptcy Court
  • U.S. Magistrate Court
  • U.S. Attorney
  • U.S. Immigration & Customs Enforcement
  • U.S. Trustee
  • EEOC
  • FBI
  • Federal Public Defender
  • N.A.S.A.
  • Office of Homeland Security

Students are not able to receive both academic credit and scholarships – only one or the other. 

Eligibility:  Full-time students at any accredited U.S. law school who: have completed at least 30 hours of course work by June 1, 2015; at the time of application, have a GPA which ranks in the top half of the applicant’s law school class; and have secured or will secure an internship with a federal court or agency within the district.

Application:  Send a resume with your GPA and class rank together with a letter: identifying your federal employer(s), date(s) of employment, and other stipends or awards received; describing your interest in federal public service; and discussing any special circumstances you would like considered to fba.southtx@gmail.com.

Deadline: Friday, May 8, 2015. All applicants will receive a response by May 15, 2015.

For more information, contact Jay Huffman at jhuffman@blankrome.com.

The receipt of this Grant is dependent upon the completion of the terms and conditions of the summer internship for a minimum of six weeks. By May 31, the applicant must provide a letter to the Federal Bar Association from one of the participating agencies or courts stating that the recipient has been accepted for a summer internship. The recipient will also be required to write a short letter to the Federal Bar Association at the end of the internship reviewing the internship experience. Applicants should confirm with their intern employer their ability to accept Fellowship proceeds. Additionally, acceptance of this scholarship may impact the recipient’s entitlement to concurrent course credit. Applicants should therefore check with their law school for clarification.

Virtual Student Foreign Service for 2015-16 Academic Year

Many students would love to have the chance to do internships with the U.S. Department of State but do not have the financial or time resources needed for them to be able to travel to an internship duty site in Washington, D.C. or at one of the diplomatic posts overseas.

An excellent option for interested students is a virtual internship with the Virtual Student Foreign Service (VSFS). Virtual interns apply to work on one of 300+ projects that have been requested by Foreign Service Officers who are posted overseas or are working in Washington.

The application window for the 2015-16 VSFS eInternship Program will be July 2-22, 2015. You can get ready now to become an eIntern!

eInterns play an important role in advancing the federal government’s reach in diplomacy, development, journalism, trade, environment, health, and agriculture initiatives. There’s something for everyone. Last year, 11 agencies participated including the State Department, USAID, the Smithsonian, NASA, EPA and Education.

eInterns scan expect to work approximately ten hours a week on most projects from September through May. Although this is unpaid, volunteer work, VSFS eInternships provide the opportunity to make a difference, connect with U.S. diplomats, and gain valuable experience. Depending on the nature of the internship project, and the student’s own college or university, an eInternship may qualify for course credit.

All applicants must be U.S. citizens, and enrolled in at least one university-level, on-site course being taught in the U.S. or abroad.

San Francisco IP Law Association Job Fair (Aug. 8, 2015) – Student Registration/Bidding now open thru May 24, 2015

18th Annual SFIPLA Bay Area Job Fair
Saturday, August 8, 2015
University of California Hastings College of Law in San Francisco, CA

Texas Law students may register and submit bids for the SFIPLA Bay Area Job Fair beginning Thursday, April 23, 2015. All registration information (including submitted bids) must be completed by 3 p.m. (CT) on Sunday, May 24, 2015. Rising 2Ls and 3Ls (Class of 2016 and 2017) may participate. Registration and bidding takes place on the SFIPLA Symplicity module.

Please note that only student members of SFIPLA are permitted to participate in the job fair. For complete student information, including how to become a member, please read the 2015 Student Job Fair Letter.

If you have any questions about this fair, please contact Alisha Camacho, Job Fair Coordinator, at acamacho@law.utexas.edu.

New Website Features Judicial Internship Postings in Texas

Still looking for a judicial internship for the upcoming summer?  Check out the new Interns Across Texas website, which is a database of available judicial internships in Texas created and maintained by the Texas Young Lawyers Association.

Although unpaid, any judicial internship is a valuable experience—you can improve your research and writing skills, observe court proceedings, and become familiar with the legal community in a specific city.

Internships with federal courts and state appellate courts may qualify for academic credit, but students must obtain instructor approval to register and attend an orientation before beginning the internship (see Judicial Internship Program).  The deadlines for whole-session summer courses apply.

For additional judicial internship postings, visit the CSO Job Bank on Symplicity.

CSO Panels & Workshops Available Online

Did you miss a program this past year? You may now review many of the panels and workshops presented by the Career Services Office this past year (UT EID required):

Webinar: Credit Suisse Summer Associate Information – New Date (June 3, 2015)

Credit Suisse Summer Associate Information Webinar
Wednesday, June 3, at 5 p.m. ET/4 p.m. CT – Register by June 2, 2015


Learn about Credit Suisse, associate roles in Investment Banking and Private Banking, and the application and interview process. Hear from Credit Suisse employees in the departments who also have law school degrees. There will be an opportunity to ask questions.

Register online by Tuesday, June 2, 2015.

Becoming a Professional: Develop a Professional Attitude

Mary Crane (www.marycrane.com), who conducts our 1L Etiquette Dinners, recently posted this in her April 2015 enewsletter.

Becoming a Professional: Develop a Professional Attitude

Virtually every employer reports they have little difficulty finding smart, technically competent students for their summer intern and associate programs. However, many of those same businesses report that too many students lack so-called “professional” skills. To convey that you are a professional, focus on looking the part, sounding the part, and developing a professional attitude.

Develop a Professional Attitude

Attitude is everything. You can wear the wrong outfit to work once and still recover. You can even survive a meeting in which you seem less than confident about a particular assertion. But if you bring an unprofessional attitude to work, I can assure you that your summer work experience will not yield the job offer you want.

Following are five attitudes you need to demonstrate each and every day:

  • Be prepared – At a very minimum, once you enter an office, carry a pen and paper or an electronic tablet with you everywhere. This allows you to accurately record assignments and requests as they are delivered. Trust me on this: you never want to interrupt a senior partner to ask, “Do you have a pen so that I can write this down?” The only thing worse may be thinking that you can remember a very specific request . . . and then failing to do so.
  • Take initiative – Attend every event to which you are invited this summer. This includes every single meeting, training program, and business-social event. Employers schedule training events and meetings to increase your knowledge and skills. Show an eagerness to learn and grow. As to social events, these are scheduled so that an employer can start to know you as an individual. Demonstrate an interest in every single person you meet and the organization that has employed you.
  • Welcome feedback – It’s easy to receive positive feedback. Responding to constructive feedback can be more difficult. But here’s what’s important: if you’re told that you need to show some improvement, and then, if in fact, your performance improves, you will actually make a far more positive impression than the person who performed okay but never improved from their first day of work. With any feedback that’s less than positive, here’s your rule of thumb: own the problem and fix it!
  • Understand client service – In a knowledge economy, employers expect summer hires to bring to the workplace a certain threshold of “book smarts.” Possessing a client-service attitude will distinguish you as a professional. Focus on your internal and external clients’ short- and long-term goals. Demonstrate a desire and an ability to help them accomplish their goals.
  • Show some gratitude – A little bit of gratitude will take you a long way. It communicates that you understand your place in the world, which is not necessarily at the center of your employer’s universe. Gratitude can help you land a job, and showing a lack of gratitude can keep you from receiving an offer. Express your appreciation to everyone with whom you work, from hiring partners to office support staff.

Becoming a Professional: Sound the Part

Mary Crane (www.marycrane.com), who conducts our 1L Etiquette Dinners, recently posted this in her April 2015 enewsletter.

Becoming a Professional: Sound the Part

Virtually every employer reports they have little difficulty finding smart, technically competent students for their summer intern and associate programs. However, many of those same businesses report that too many students lack so-called “professional” skills. To convey that you are a professional, focus on looking the part, sounding the part, and developing a professional attitude.

Sound the Part

Just as it’s important for you to look the part, it’s equally important that you sound like a professional. This requires that you sound confident but not arrogant. Before you open your mouth (or draft an email for that matter), be certain of the message you want to communicate, choose your words carefully, and speak succinctly.

If necessary, address the following specific speech habits:

  • Use of space fillers – When they are uncertain about what to say next, many summer employees allow space fillers, words like “uhm,” “ah,” “like,” and “you know,” to pepper their language. Employers complain that these are distracting at best and make summer hires sound completely unprofessional at worst. If you are uncertain as to what you should say, simply pause. When you next speak, you’ll sound thoughtful and deliberative.
  • Inflecting up at the end of a sentence – This verbal tic communicates that you are uncertain about what you just said. When you ask a question, your voice should inflect up. When you make a definitive statement, your voice should end on a down note. (If you need an example of someone making a series of definitive statements that end in periods rather than question marks, listen to Jon Stewart or any “real” newsperson.)
  • Learn to respond to “thank you” – When you turn in an assignment this summer and a senior employee says “Thank you,” respond, “It was my pleasure,” or “I enjoyed the assignment. Is there anything else that I can help you with?” Please do not respond, “No problem,” which completely diminishes the work you just did.

Becoming a Professional: Look the Part

Mary Crane (www.marycrane.com), who conducts our 1L Etiquette Dinners, recently posted this in her April 2015 enewsletter.

Becoming a Professional: Look the Part

Virtually every employer reports they have little difficulty finding smart, technically competent students for their summer intern and associate programs. However, many of those same businesses report that too many students lack so-called “professional” skills. To convey that you are a professional, focus on looking the part, sounding the part, and developing a professional attitude.

Look the Part

This is one area in which earlier generations had an easier time of it. When previous generations entered the workforce, new professionals donned the “uniform,” which for both men and women consisted of structured suits, crisp shirts/blouses, and well-polished conservative shoes. Today’s rules regarding appropriate attire are less formal, making it easier for a new professional to make a serious mistake.

Before you head to work, if your employer has not specified appropriate attire, plan to dress as you would for an interview—not a bad idea given that a summer internship or associate program effectively is a multi-week interview. Then use your first week to observe key players in the workplace and take their lead. If junior professionals dress in suits, you should plan on doing the same. If instead “business casual” is the norm, you may forego a suit.

Here’s what’s absolutely critical: throughout the entirety of your summer employment, never confuse “business casual” attire with “casual” attire. If you’ve been told “business casual” is appropriate, khaki slacks or skirts and well-pressed cotton or linen shirts/blouses will almost always work. Store a “just in case” blazer or jacket in your office (“just in case” you’re unexpectedly invited out to a nice business meal or to an important client event.)

And please avoid these mistakes:

  • Ladies, sundresses with or without a sweater, are not appropriate in most business offices.
  • Gentlemen, if you don’t need to wear a tie, cover up your chest hair, which no one wants to see.
  • Torn jeans and shorts are never appropriate in an office setting.
  • Any footwear that draws attention is probably a bad idea. If you wear sandals during your commute, change into business shoes before you reach the office.

New Texas State Bar Rule Affecting Summer Employment

Students working in Texas this summer (or might be working here later) should be familiar that the State Bar’s ethics committee has enacted a new rule (State Bar of Texas Opinion No. 644). The rule makes it harder for employers to hire you if you’ve ever worked on the other side of a case that the employer is handling. The Deans of all ten Texas law schools are seeking reconsideration of the rule. In the meantime, though, here are two important recommendations for your summer experience:

  1. Keep a personal conflicts log. Excel example includes instructions.
  2. Be alert to this issue when given a new assignment. If the circumstances allow it, you might ask an employer not to assign you to a particular matter if there is a high risk that it might preclude future employment elsewhere. We do not foresee this happening often. But if (for example) you are clerking for Firm A in the first half of the summer and Firm B in the second half, you would not want to work on a problem at Firm A if Firm B is on the other side.
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