The University of Texas at Austin   School of Law

The Bernard and Audre Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice

Partners for change at the intersection of academics and advocacy.


Annual Reviews

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The 2013-2014 Annual Review is our 10th Anniversary Edition and features a close look at what we did last year in each of our principal areas of teaching, research, and advocacy, situated within a bird’s eye view of what we have accomplished in those areas over the past ten years.

Highlights of the 2012-2013 Annual Review include our work: supporting hands-on legal experience through international and transnational human rights internships, showcasing the life and career of Frances T. "Sissy" Farenthold thanks to a grant from the Creekmore and Adele Fath Charitable Foundation, analyzing the intersection of human rights and art, and exploring the human rights movement's focus on anti-impunity at our ninth annual conference.

Highlights of the 2011-2012 Annual Review include our work: launching a UT-hosted website containing millions of digitized documents from the Historic Archive of the National Police of Guatemala, contributing to a MacArthur Foundation study on the use of electronic evidence in human rights cases, creating an online exhibit on Frances T. "Sissy" Farenthold, and exploring the promises and pitfalls of property rights at our eighth annual conference.

Highlights of the 2010-2011 Annual Review include our work: exploring the contested legacies of conflict with the "Aftershocks" conference, launching a working paper series on human rights, partnering with the Historic Archive of the National Police of Guatemala, and expanding the scope of the Center's working groups.

Highlights of the 2009-2010 Annual Review include our work: expanding the human rights curriculum at UT, collaborating on initiatives that intersect human rights and the arts, examining the effects of border walls on individuals and communities, and promoting interdisciplinary dialogue on human rights at the university and beyond.

Highlights of the 5-year anniversary 2008-2009 Annual Review include our work: investigating the cultural and economic marginalization of Afro-Ecuadorians, exploring continuing legal challenges to the U.S.-Mexico border wall, bringing human rights archives to U.T., and expanding the university's human rights-related course offerings and internship opportunities.

Highlights of the 2007-2008 Annual Review include our work: reporting on Afro-descendant land rights in Brazil, examining impunity in Guatemala, challenging the U.S.-Mexico border wall, raising human rights awareness through performing arts, and remembering the civil war in El Salvador.

Highlights of the 2006-2007 Annual Review include our work: promoting human rights dialogue through conferences addressing women’s rights and U.S. foreign policy, challenging detention policies at Guantánamo and the Texas Detention Center, reaching out to the community with the Living Newspaper project, and gathering information about Afro-descendant land rights in Colombia.

Highlights of the 2005-2006 Annual Review include our work: developing a new strategic vision for the Rapoport Center, creating awareness of the relationship between culture and human rights in our “Representing Culture” symposium, providing legal services to immigrants and Guantanamo detainees, educating high school students through the Living Newspaper project, and hosting human rights happy hour speakers.

Highlights of the 2004-2005 Annual Review include our work: stimulating discussion about immigration and outsourcing with the “Working Borders” conference, supporting the work of the Transnational Worker Rights and Immigration clinics, and funding student human rights opportunities abroad.

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