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Adjudicating Culture, Politicizing Law:
Legal Strategies for Black and Indigenous Land Rights Struggles in the Americas

The University of Texas at Austin
April 28–29

Confirmed Participants

Participants' Biographies

  • José Aylwin is the Coordinator of the Indigenous Rights Program at the Universidad de la Frontera in Temuco, Chile. His recent works in the field include: El acceso de los indígenas a la tierra en los ordenamientos jurídicos de América Latina: un estudio de casos (2002), "Conflicts in the Mapuche Territory: Causes and Perspectives," and "Indigenous Rights in Chile: Advances and Contradictions in the Context of Economic Globalization." Professor Aylwin is one of the region's major experts on the legal recognition and protection of indigenous land rights. He argues that the gradual process by which indigenous peoples were dispossessed of their ancestral lands was in some countries actually intensified rather than hindered by the official indigenista and agrarian reform policies that were introduced by several Latin American countries in the post-World War II period. Professor Aylwin has pointed out that the historical demand of indigenous peoples for land has both a material and spiritual component and that the latter is growing in importance as indigenous peoples and their leaders stress both the political and symbolic meanings of the recognition of their land rights. The demand now is for self-determination and autonomy regarding the lands and the natural resources to which the indigenous peoples relate collectively and to which they have a special relationship. Professor Aylwin is also the director of Chile's Indigenous Peoples' Rights Watch. This organization, along with Human Rights Watch, created a report on the Chilean government's use of anti-terrorism laws threatening indigenous rights.

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  • Amita Baviskar (Stanford University) is a visiting Associate Professor in the Cultural and Social Anthropology Department. Her research focuses on the cultural politics of environment and development. Dr. Baviskar received her PhD in 1992 from Cornell in Development Sociology. Her research addresses environmental politics, with a focus on social inequality and natural resource conflicts, environmental and indigenous social movements, the anthropology of development, post-colonial cities, state formation, and the environment in south Asia. After teaching at the University of Delhi for almost a decade, she was a Ciriacy-Wantrup Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. She has also taught at Cornell University.

    Baviskar is the author of In the Belly of the River: Tribal Conflicts over Development in the Narmada Valley (Oxford University Press 1995, 2004) and has edited the anthology Waterlines: The Penguin Book of River Writings (Penguin 2003). Another edited volume, Waterscapes: The Cultural Politics of a Natural Resource, is forthcoming from University of Washington Press and Permanent Black. Her research has been conducted in close association with rights groups in India. Her regular contributions to newspapers and other public fora express a commitment to political action and scholarship outside the academy.

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  • Joseph Berra is Executive Director of the Caribbean Central American Research Council (CCARC), a non-profit activist research institute focusing on the intersection of race, rights, and resources in the Caribbean and Central America. As an attorney, Mr. Berra's legal work has involved advocating for the rights of immigrants, minorities, and indigenous peoples through litigation, legislative advocacy, and public policy research. From 2000 to 2004 he was in charge of the Immigrant Rights Program Area of the Southwest Regional Office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) in San Antonio.

    Prior to his position at MALDEF, he was a 1997 National Association of Public Interest Law (NAPIL) Equal Justice Fellow for work at AYUDA, Inc., of Washington, D.C. While in Washington, Mr. Berra also worked on a pro-bono basis with the Center for Justice in International Law (CEJIL) in the development of cases before the Inter-American Commission for Human Rights. He spent the summer of 1995 as a public interest law fellow working with the Fray Bartolomé de las Casas Center for Human Rights in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Mr. Berra received his JD from St. Mary's University School of Law in 1997. He also holds an MA in social anthropology from the University of Texas at Austin, an M.Div. from the Central American University in San Salvador, El Salvador, and a BA in philosophy from St. Louis University. A former Jesuit priest, Mr. Berra worked for ten years in Central America in various pastoral and social ministries of the Central American Province of the Society of Jesus.

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  • Sarah H. Cleveland (UT Law) is the Marrs McLean Professor in Law at the University of Texas School of Law, where she has been on the faculty since 1997. A graduate of Yale Law School, her teaching and scholarly interests include foreign affairs and the Constitution, international human and labor rights, and federal civil procedure. She holds her undergraduate degree from Brown University and a Masters degree in history from Oxford University, where she studied as a Rhodes Scholar. After graduating from law school, Cleveland served as a law clerk to Judge Louis F. Oberdorfer on the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, and then to Justice Harry A. Blackmun on the Supreme Court of the United States. She then served two years as a Skadden Fellow with Florida Legal Services, conducting impact litigation on behalf of Caribbean sugar cane workers and other migrant workers in the southeastern United States. Her publications include: "Powers Inherent in Sovereignty: Indians, Aliens, Territories, and the Nineteenth-Century Origins of Plenary Power Over Foreign Affairs" (Texas Law Review, 2002); "Human Rights Sanctions and International Trade: A Theory of Compatibility" (Journal of International Economic Law, 2002); "Norm Internalization and U.S. Economic Sanctions" (Yale Journal of International Law, 2001); and "Global Labor Rights and the Alien Tort Claims Act" (Texas Law Review, 1998).

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  • Allen Cooper (MPP 2003, Princeton) is a J.D. candidate at the University of Texas where he is a William Wayne Justice Institute Public Interest Scholar. He previously worked as lead organizer of Austin Interfaith and as founding director of the West Virginia Organizing Project. Cooper recently completed a six-month project in Chile investigating the impact of the creation of private conservation reserves on the land claims of the indigenous Mapuche people. He plans to pursue a career in human rights advocacy.

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  • Ariel Dulitzky is a Human Rights Senior Specialist for the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, where he advises governmental and international organizations on human rights policies and legal standards. He has more than ten years experience of working with the Inter-American human rights system. He earned his law degree from the University of Buenos Aires School of Law and an LL.M. from Harvard through the Amalia Lacroze de Fortabat Fellowship. One of his many significant contributions to the work at the IACHR was his work on the creation of the Special Rapporteurship on Afro-Descendants and Racial Discrimination. He also played a crucial role in the adoption by the Commission of many decisions dealing with indigenous people. Prior to joining the IACHR, Dulitzky served as the Latin America Program Director at the International Human Rights Law Group where he developed a program on Racial Discrimination in Brazil and oversaw the Law Group's Program in the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua; the Co-Executive Director of the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL), a non-governmental organization dedicated to promoting international human rights and the rule of law in Latin America; and director of CEJIL's regional offices in Central America.

    Dulitzky has published several articles on human rights, racial discrimination, and the rule of law in Latin America. His publications are particularly relevant: The Indigenous Community: Inter-American System Jurisprudence and Human Rights Protection (1997), "Perspectives on Human Rights: Social, Economic and Cultural Rights" (2003), and "A Region in Denial: Racial Discrimination in Latin America" (2005). He has also taught at the Washington College of Law at American University.

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  • Karen L Engle is W.H. Francis, Jr. Professor in Law and Director of the Center for Human Rights at The University of Texas School of Law, where she has taught since 2002. Previously she was Professor of Law at the University of Utah, where she taught for ten years. She teaches courses in employment discrimination, public international law and international human rights. She also teaches specialized human rights seminars, including "Third World and Feminist Approaches to International Law" and "Human Rights and the Uses of Culture."

    Professor Engle received her J.D. magna cum laude from Harvard Law School and her undergraduate degree from Baylor University. Following law school and a clerkship with Judge Jerre S. Williams on the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, Engle returned to Harvard Law School as a post-doctoral Ford Fellow in Public International Law. During the second year of her fellowship, she also served as Program Director.

    Professor Engle lectures extensively in the U.S. and Europe on identity politics and international human rights law, and is currently working on a book on human rights and culture. She is co-editor of After Identity: A Reader in Law and Culture (Routledge 1992) and author of numerous articles, the most recent of which include "Feminism and Its (Dis)contents: Criminalizing War-Time Rape in Bosnia," (forthcoming), "International Human Rights and Feminisms: When Discourses Keep Meeting" (forthcoming), "The Construction of Good Aliens and Good Citizens: Legitimizing the War on Terrorism" (Colorado Law Review), "From Skepticism to Embrace: Human Rights and the American Anthropological Association from 1947–1999," (Human Rights Quarterly, 2001), and "Culture and Human Rights: The Asian Values Debate in Context" (NYU Journal of International Law & Policy, 2000). Her 1992 article, "Female Subjects of Public International Law: Human Rights and the Exotic Other Female" has been reprinted and excerpted in numerous text books and collections in the U.S. and abroad.

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  • Melissa M. Forbis (UT Anthropology) is a PhD candidate in Social Anthropology. Her research interests include feminist and gender theory, neoliberalism, nationalism and indigenous rights. She is currently completing her dissertation entitled "Gender, Autonomy and Indigenous Rights in Chiapas, Mexico." Her research for the past eight years on the region has resulted in a number of invited presentations, including a recent seminar at the Center for Research and Advanced Studies in Social Anthropology in Mexico City on the new forms of Zapatista governance. Her publications include two book chapters, book reviews and an article in Spanish under review. She is also a long-time community organizer focusing on creating alternative political spaces. Forbis will be a Women's Studies Dissertation Fellow at UCSB during 2005–06.

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  • Kaushik Ghosh (UT Anthropology and Asian Studies) focuses on South Asia, colonialism, social movements, and globalization. Dr. Ghosh taught at Vassar in Fall 2002. He was on the editorial board of Cultural Anthropology. Previously he was at the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta (CSSSC) and the University of Washington, Seattle. His publications have appeared in Subaltern Studies and are forthcoming in Positions and Cultural Anthropology. Having been long involved with ecological and indigenous peoples' movements in India, Dr. Ghosh has been involved with students in Seattle in Zapatista Support groups and anti-globalization work. In recent years he has been working on urban restructuring in India.

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  • Jennifer Goett is a Ph.D. Candidate in Social Anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests include critical race theory, subaltern history, nationalism, and afro-descendent and indigenous land rights in Latin America. She has received research fellowships from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Fulbright Foundation, and the Tinker Foundation. Ms. Goett conducted dissertation research with afro-descendent and indigenous communities on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua between 2001 and 2004. In 2003, she coordinated Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and land use mapping for a World Bank project that documented Awas Tingni's communal land claim. Additionally, she has worked as a research consultant for the Ford Foundation, the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), and Centro de Investigaciones y Documentación de la Costa Atlántica (CIDCA-UCA) in Nicaragua. She is currently completing her doctoral dissertation, which is entitled Race and the Cultural Politics of Creole Resource Rights in Nicaragua, 1786–2003.

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  • Edmund T. Gordon (UT Anthropology) is the Director of the Center for African and African American Studies and Associate Professor of Anthropology at The University of Texas at Austin. His research interests include culture and power in the African Diaspora, gender studies, critical race theory, and political economy. His research in these areas has resulted in a number of publications including "Cultural Politics of Black Masculinity," Transforming Anthropology, 1997; "The African Diaspora: Towards an Ethnography of Diasporic Identification," Journal of American Folklore, 1999; and Disparate Diasporas: Identity and Politics in an African-Nicaraguan Community, University of Texas Press, 1998. His current work focuses on race and the struggle for resources among Black communities in Central America and the Southern U.S.

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  • Charles Hale (UT Anthropology) is Associate Professor of Anthropology and past Associate Director of the Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (2000–03), both at the University of Texas. Previously he taught at the University of California, Davis. He earned his PhD in Anthropology from Stanford University. He has received research fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Social Science Research Council (SSRC), and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Dr. Hale currently serves on the Regional Advisory Committee for Latin America of the SSRC. He is author of Resistance and Contradiction: Miskitu Indians and the Nicaraguan State, 1894–1987 (1994); co-editor (with Gustavo Palma and Clara Arenas) of Racismo en Guatemala: Abriendo debate sobre un tema tabú; and co-editor (with Jeffrey Gould and Darío Euraque) of Memorias del mestizaje: Cultura y política en Centroamérica, 1920 al presente (forthcoming). He also is author of numerous articles on identity politics, racism, ethnic conflict, and the status of indigenous peoples in Latin America.

    Dr. Hale has served as principal investigator on a series of activist research projects focused on black and indigenous land rights in Central America. These involve working with inter-disciplinary teams of researchers and community leaders to document land claims, and then to create maps of those claims, using handheld GPS systems and computer-based cartography. Two of these projects (Nicaragua 1997–98 and Honduras 2001–02) were funded by the World Bank; he presently co-directs another funded by the Ford Foundation. Hale also has served as an expert witness in the Inter-American Court of Human Rights case Awas Tingni v. Government of Nicaragua, which resulted in a landmark decision in favor of indigenous community land rights.

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  • Candis Hamilton is an attorney in the Chambers of Gifford, Thompson & Bright in Jamaica. Lord Anthony Gifford, who heads the Chambers, is one of Jamaica's leading human rights attorneys. She also works part-time as a consultant for the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, on a promotional project in the Caribbean. She also serves as Legal Director on the board of the Jamaica Environment Trust (JET), a non-profit organization conducting Jamaica's largest environmental education program. Ms. Hamilton graduated magna cum laude from Howard University, where she was inducted into the national honor society Phi Beta Kappa. She received a law degree from the University of Miami School of Law and a Master's in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from New York University. Since graduating from law school her work has focused on community development, racial discrimination, and human rights projects in South Africa and Jamaica. She spent three years as a Legal Field Officer in Nicaragua with the Washington, D.C.-based International Human Rights Law Group, where she assisted the Latin American team developing a capacity-building and advocacy project on communal lands for indigenous and Afro-Caribbean communities of the Autonomous Region of the South Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua. She participated in the University of Florida Law School's 2001 Costa Rica Program and assisted in developing its Caribbean initiative. Ms. Hamilton was chosen for the IACHR Delegation to Haiti, conducting the on-site visit in 2004.

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  • Rosalva Aída Hernández Castillo (CIESAS, Mexico, D.F.) is an anthropologist and activist who lived for fifteen years in Chiapas. She earned her doctorate in anthropology from Stanford University. She currently works under the auspices of CIESAS, the Center for Research and Advanced Studies in Social Anthropology. One of her projects involves exploring new and old opportunities for power through indigenous women, collective organization, and daily resistance by analyzing the comparative histories of indigenous women's initiatives in Chiapas, Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Veracruz. She has worked extensively in the past on exploring plural identities in Chiapas as well as the human rights of Guatemalan refugees in Mexico. Hernandez Castillo lectured at the University of London Instititute of Latin American Studies on "Indigenous Law and Identity Politics in Mexico: Women's Struggles in a Multicultural Nation" and "Indigenous Cosmovision as an Element of Resistance in the Struggles of Indigenous Women in Mesoamerica." She is also on the Humanities Awards Commission for the Academia Mexicana de Ciencias. Her publications include: El Estado y los indígenas en tiempos del PAN: neoindigenismo, identidad y legalidad (2004), Mayan Lives, Mayan Utopias: the Indigenous Peoples of Chiapas and the Zapatista Rebellion (2003); and The Other Word: Women and Violence in Chiapas Before and After Acteal (2001).

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  • Juliet Hooker is an Assistant Professor of Government at The University of Texas at Austin. She received her PhD in Government from Cornell University. Her current research focuses on multicultural citizenship reform in Latin America, black and indigenous politics in Central America, and nationalism and civic solidarity. She is currently completing a book manuscript on the construction of political solidarity in multiracial and multicultural societies. She has published articles (forthcoming in 2005) analyzing the disparity in collective rights gained by black and indigenous groups in Latin America since the adoption of multicultural citizenship reforms, and on the persistence of official discourses of mestizo nationalism in Nicaragua that continue to inhibit the full political inclusion of black and indigenous costeños despite the adoption of multicultural citizenship reforms in the 1980s.

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  • William Maurer (UC Irvine) has provoked questions about deeply held beliefs about the nature of law and economy. Maurer's research queries narratives of globalization's effects by looking into its fabrication, through the entanglements of subjects and objects of law, property, and value that make it up. His first book, on the colonial transformation of the British Virgin Islands from a backwater of small-scale farmers and traders to a booming offshore financial services center, led him to question the cultural ramifications of finance capital, the legal creation of objects of property held to "move" in new transnational circuits, and the conceptions of mobility animating contemporary financial forms. His second book, Mutual Life, Limited: Islamic Banking, Alternative Currencies, Lateral Reason (Princeton 2005) explores financial alternatives and the relationship between the problem of money and the problem of social critique. Professor Maurer's research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation. He was a co-recipient of the Law and Society Association Article Prize in 2003 for "In the Mirror: The Legitimation Work of Globalization," Law and Social Inquiry (2003). His most recent writings include "Due Diligence and 'Reasonable Man,' Offshore," Cultural Anthropology (in press 2005); "Introduction: Ethnographic Emergences," American Anthropologist (2005); "The Cultural Power of Law? Conjunctive Readings," Law and Society Review (2004); and "Ungrounding Knowledges Offshore: Caribbean Studies, Disciplinarity and Critique," in Comparative American Studies (2004).

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  • Sally Engle Merry is Marion Butler McLean Professor in the History of Ideas and Professor of Anthropology at Wellesley College. In September 2005 she will move to New York University. Her current research explores how international human rights law is interpreted in China, India, Nigeria, and Peru. Her recent book, Human Rights and Gender Violence in the New World Order: Translating Culture, will be published by the University of Chicago Press in 2005. She has recently published articles on women's human rights, violence against women, and the process of localizing human rights. Colonizing Hawai'i: The Cultural Power of Law (Princeton University Press, 2000), received the 2001 J. Willard Hurst Prize from the Law and Society Association. Her other books are Law and Empire in the Pacific: Hawai'i and Fiji (co-edited with Donald Brenneis, School of American Research Press, 2004), The Possibility of Popular Justice: A Case Study of American Community Mediation (co-edited with Neal Milner, University of Michigan Press, 1993), Getting Justice and Getting Even: Legal Consciousness among Working Class Americans (University of Chicago Press, 1990), and Urban Danger: Life in a Neighborhood of Strangers (Temple University Press, 1981). She is past president of the Law and Society Association and the Association for Political and Legal Anthropology.

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  • Vivian Newdick is a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology at UT Austin. She came to anthropology after seven years' work in Chiapas, Mexico, with indigenous and economic rights movements. Her research currently concerns feminist theory, sexual violence, and human rights within empire. A recent paper on this topic, tentatively titled "The Indigenous Woman Victim Subject and Neoliberal Governance in Mexico," is under review for publication.

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  • Bettina Ng'weno (UC Davis) is Assistant Professor in the African American and African Studies program and has contributed extensively to provoke the questions raised in this workshop. As an anthropologist who has worked both in Africa and Latin America, her research focuses on the question of why certain kinds of property are crucial for governing in modern states. She contributed her expertise to the World Bank, writing on their participation in the collective territories titling process for Afro-Colombians. Her current work focuses on Afro-Colombian territorial claims in the Andes and their status as ethnic groups under the rubric of the new 1991 Colombian Constitution. As such, she investigates the relationships among a number of processes including the definition of property and authority, the categorization of subjects of the state, the creation of political spaces, and the institutionalization of legal rulings and laws.

    Professor Ng'weno has written on ethnic politics in the department of Cauca since the new constitution, the status of Afro-Colombian collective territories, and the internal displacement of Afro-Colombians. She has also written on identity, social continuity and meaning among the Muslim matrilineal Digo of coastal Kenya as they negotiate the inheritance of land under plural legal systems that recognize different heirs. Professor Ng'weno is a member of the Black Diaspora Consortium Project Team, a collaborative effort of scholars and activists committed to actively working for social justice for (by, and with) African and African descended populations.

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  • Shannon Speed (UT Anthropology) holds an MA in Latin American Studies from the University of Texas and an MA and PhD in Anthropology and Native American Studies from the University of California, Davis. Professor Speed's research interests include human rights, indigenous rights, globalization, gender, social justice and resistance movements, and activist research methods.

    For the past eight years, Professor Speed's research has been carried out in Chiapas, Mexico. From 1996–1998, she was the Coordinator of a U.S.-based non-governmental organization (NGO), Global Exchange, in San Cristóbal de Las Casas, one of Chiapas's principal cities. Since 1999, she has been an advisor to the Chiapas Community Human Rights Defenders' Network. This organization was created to train young indigenous people from regions of conflict in Chiapas to conduct their own human rights defense work; today, it has twenty-six trained "defenders" whose work covers more than three-hundred communities. A principal objective in forming the Defenders' Network was to support the movement for indigenous autonomy in the region by empowering the indigenous communities and decreasing their dependence on external sources of support, including NGOs and government agencies. Speed has published research on the Defenders' Network and human rights work "from the community," as well as participating as an advisor to the group, an example of the kind of engaged "activist research" that she advocates.

    Professor Speed is currently completing a book entitled Global Discourses on the Local Terrain: Human Rights and Indigenous Resistance in Chiapas, as well as co-editing two volumes, Human Rights in the Maya Region: Global Politics, Moral Engagements, and Culture Contentions and Dissident Women: Gender, Ethnicity and Power in Chiapas.

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  • Pauline Turner Strong (UT Anthropology) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Center for Women's and Gender Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She received her BA in Philosophy at Colorado College, and her MA and PhD in Sociocultural Anthropology from the University of Chicago. Her research centers on the representation and self-representation of Native American cultures and identities in such venues as literature, film, museums, sports events, youth organizations, scholarship, and legislation. Her 1999 book, Captive Selves, Captivating Others: The Politics and Poetics of Colonial American Captivity Narratives, won an Honorable Mention for the 2000 Chicago Folklore Prize. Her articles appear in Cultural Anthropology, Ethnohistory, Journal of American Folklore, Museum Anthropology, Social Analysis, and elsewhere. She is President of the Society for Cultural Anthropology, following terms on the society's Executive Board and Editorial Board.

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  • Eva Thorne (Brandeis University) dedicates her teaching and research to international institutions (with a focus on the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank), government and politics of Latin America (with a focus on Brazil and Central America), and U.S. politics. She is doing research on the politics of Afro-Latin and indigenous land rights. Prof. Thorne has carried out research on the subject in Brazil, Honduras, and Panama. She was recently awarded a grant from the Ford Foundation to hold several workshops with academics and applied analysts to explore the subject. She has published a relevant article on "Ethnic and Race-Based Political Organization and Mobilization in Latin America: Lessons for Public Policy." Thorne has recently published on Garifuna land rights in Honduras and has an article under review on the same topic. Her second book project is on black land rights in Latin America.

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  • Gerald Torres (UT Law) is the H. O. Head Centennial Professor in Real Property Law at UT. Professor Torres is currently the president of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS). A leading figure in critical race theory, Torres is also an expert in agricultural and environmental law. He came to UT Law in 1993 after teaching at The University of Minnesota Law School, where he also served as associate dean. Torres has served as deputy assistant attorney general for the Environment and Natural Resources Division of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., and as counsel to then U.S. attorney general Janet Reno.

    His latest book, The Miner's Canary: Enlisting Race, Resisting Power, Transforming Democracy (Harvard University Press, 2002) with Harvard law professor Lani Guinier, was described by Publisher's Weekly as "one of the most provocative and challenging books on race produced in years." Torres' many articles include "Translation and Stories" (Harvard Law Review, 2002), "Who Owns the Sky?" (Pace Law Review, 2001) (Garrison Lecture), "Taking and Giving: Police Power, Public Value, and Private Right" (Environmental Law, 1996), and "Translating Yonnondio by Precedent and Evidence: The Mashpee Indian Case" (Duke Law Journal, 1990).

    Torres has served on the board of the Environmental Law Institute and the National Petroleum Council and on EPA's National Environmental Justice Advisory Council. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the American Law Institute. Torres was honored with the 2004 Legal Service Award from the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) for his work to advance the legal rights of Latinos. He has been a visiting professor at Harvard and Stanford law schools.

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  • Rebecca Tsosie (Arizona State University) is the Lincoln Professor of Native American Law & Ethics at Arizona State University Law School. She is also Executive Director of ASUs Indian Legal Program and Affiliate Professor of the American Indian Studies Program. She serves as a Supreme Court Justice for Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation. Professor Tsosie teaches in the areas of Indian law, Property, Bioethics, and Critical Race Theory, and she is the author of several articles dealing with cultural resources, environmental policy, and cultural pluralism. She is the recipient of the American Bar Association's "2002 Spirit of Excellence Award." Professor Tsosie has given a number of presentations this year, including the keynote address at the Asian-Pacific Law and Policy Journal's Symposium at the U of Hawaii on "Protecting Indigenous Identities: Struggles and Strategies Under International and Comparative Law." The title of her keynote address was: "What does it mean 'To Build a Nation?': Reimagining Indigenous Political Identity in an Era of Self-Determination."

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  • Kamala Visweswaran (UT Anthropology) dedicates herself to social anthropology, feminist theory and ethnography, critical historiography, nationalism; and South Asia. A cultural anthropologist by training, Dr. Visweswaran is interdisciplinary in her work. While a Radcliffe Institute Fellow 2001–02, she explored how the identification of women with community has gendered the subject of law, influencing the formulation of women's rights in colonial and postcolonial India. Her awards include two Fulbright fellowships to India and a Sawyer Seminar Mellon fellowship at the University of Chicago.

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