The University of Texas at Austin   School of Law

The Bernard and Audre Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice

Partners for change at the intersection of academics and advocacy.


Law Students: Clinical Programs

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(From left to right) Human Rights Clinic Director Ariel Dulitzky, Clinical Professor Denise Gilman, and Immigration Clinic Director Barbara Hines.

As a part of its focus on service-learning, the Bernard and Audre Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice works closely with several of the Law School's ten human- and civil rights-related clinical programs. These clinics provide direct advocacy opportunities and interdisciplinary collaboration between students and faculty.

Human Rights Clinic

As the newest clinic at the law school, the Human Rights Clinic opened in spring 2009 under the direction of Professor Ariel Dulitzky. This interdisciplinary clinic allows graduate and professional students from departments across UT to work on human rights projects and cases from the advocate's perspective. Through working on specific projects and participation in the classroom component of the clinic, students learn substantive human rights law, practice important advocacy techniques and explore different models for ethical, responsible and effective human rights advocacy. Learn more.

Immigration Clinic

The Immigration Clinic allows students to provide crucial representation to vulnerable low-income immigrants before the immigration courts, the Department of Homeland Security, the Board of Immigration Appeals and the federal courts. Through legal representation of clients and participation in the classroom component of the clinic, students learn substantive immigration law, practice important legal advocacy techniques and explore different models for ethical, responsible and effective lawyering. Through its partnership with the Immigration Clinic, the Rapoport Center maintains awareness of human rights violations throughout the world from which individuals are seeking asylum in central Texas. It also remains in contact with nongovernmental organizations in an effort to pursue strategies to aid asylum seekers and to improve the human rights situation in the clients' countries of origin. Learn more.

The National Security Clinic

Students in the National Security Clinic have the opportunity to work directly on issues relating to the government's investigation, prosecution, and detention policies in its counter-terrorism efforts both domestic and abroad. Working with faculty members, students have contributed to projects such as the preparation of appellate briefs challenging the legality of the Detainee Treatment Act and the Military Commissions Act and the legal representation of Guantanamo detainees and “enemy combatants charged under the Military Commissions Act. Clinic director Kristine Huskey says that “Students in the National Security Clinic have had the opportunity to work on cutting-edge legal issues and been involved in cases that will have significant influence on constitutional and security law for decades to come.” Learn more.

Transnational Worker Rights Clinic

The Transnational Worker Rights Clinic is the first of its kind nationwide to provide students the opportunity to represent low-income immigrant workers who seek to recover unpaid wages. The Clinic develops students' skills as practitioners and human rights advocates by teaching how to apply international labor rights standards in a local context. Learn more.

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In addition to these clinics, students also have the chance to participate in a wide array of other human rights-related clinics. They include: the Actual Innocence Clinic, the Capital Punishment Clinic, the Children’s Rights Clinic, the Criminal Defense Clinic, the Domestic Violence Clinic, the Housing Clinic, the Juvenile Justice Clinic, and the Mental Health Clinic. For more information on these clinical opportunities, see the Law School’s Clinical Programs site.