The University of Texas at Austin   School of Law

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International Programs

Internships

Guatemala, summer 2000

UT law professors have negotiated arrangements to facilitate international internships with courts, international institutions, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in Europe, Africa, and Latin America. Professors Sarah Cleveland, Karen Engle, Patricia Hansen, and Derek Jinks help recruit students and supervise the relationships between the tribunals and students. A portion of the costs of these programs has been underwritten by the Effie and Wofford Cain Foundation, and participants are also eligible for academic credit.

Since 1997, UT Law interns have been selected in a highly competitive process to work at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia in The Hague, Netherlands, including Kenn Kern, '03, who worked on the prosecution of Slobodan Milosevic, the most high-profile war crimes prosecution case since Nuremberg. The law school has also sent interns to the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in Arusha, Tanzania, where interns spend their days putting together cases against the leaders of the 1994 Rwandan genocide. In 2002, the Law School became one of only three law schools in the country to enter a formal relationship with the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in San Jose, Costa Rica, which allows students to serve as law clerks to the Court for academic credit. Students are also allowed to craft their own international internship, for academic credit. A number of internships have led law school graduates to pursue influential careers in international law (see UT Graduates Working in the International Arena).

The law school's internship programs currently include:

International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia; The Hague, The Netherlands: Six-month internship with the Prosecutor's Office of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, which was established by the UN Security Council to investigate and prosecute perpetrators of genocide and other war crimes from the conflict in the former Yugoslavia. Students participate in a range of investigative work, factual development, and legal research on both procedural and substantive international criminal law issues. UT student participants are also required to produce a substantial research paper, supervised by the UT international law faculty, as part of the internship. The internships are open to qualified third year students as well as recent graduates. Students must have strong backgrounds in international and/or criminal law. Internships run from approximately January 1–June 30 and from July 1–December 31. Participants will receive up to ten hours of academic credit and airfare (or, for recent graduates, a modest stipend to assist with living expenses and airfare). Applications for the spring internships are accepted June 1; applications for the fall internships are accepted November 1. For further information, please contact William Chandler, Rm 3.119D, wchandler@law.utexas.edu.

International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda; Arusha, Tanzania:Summer or Semester internship (minimum of 12 weeks required) with the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, which was established by the UN Security Council to investigate and prosecute participants in the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. Students work in the prosecutor's office participating in a range of investigative work, factual development, and legal research on both procedural and substantive international criminal law issues. The internships are open to qualified second and third year students as well as recent graduates. Most have strong backgrounds in international and/or criminal law. Participants in the six-month clerkships will receive up to ten hours of academic credit and airfare (or, for recent graduates, a modest stipend to assist with living expenses and airfare). Participants in the summer clerkship (minimum of 12 weeks required) will receive four hours of academic credit for the clerkship and airfare, or a modest stipend to assist with living expenses and airfare. Applications are accepted in June 1 for the spring internships and November 1 for the summer and fall internships.  For further information, please contact William Chandler, Rm 3.119D, wchandler@law.utexas.edu.

Inter-American Court for Human Rights; San José, Costa Rica:Six-month or summer clerkship with the Inter-American Court for Human Rights, which was established by the Organization of American States to hear claims against member states arising under the American Convention on Human Rights, other human rights treaties, and customary international law. Students are assigned to work with one of the Court's staff attorneys conducting research and drafting opinions for the cases before the Court. UT students participating in the six-month clerkship are also required to produce a substantial research paper, supervised by the UT international law faculty, as part of the internship. Applicants must have completed their third semester of law school, have a strong background in international and human rights law, and be fluent in Spanish (written and oral). The six-month clerkships (which are preferred by the Court) run from January–June and from July–December. Participants in the six-month clerkships will receive up to ten hours of academic credit and airfare (or, for recent graduates, a modest stipend to assist with living expenses and airfare). Participants in the summer clerkship (minimum of 12 weeks required) will receive four hours of academic credit for the clerkship and airfare, or a modest stipend to assist with living expenses and airfare. Applications for the six-month spring clerkship will be accepted June 1.¬† Applications for the summer and six-month fall clerkships will be accepted November 1. For further information, contact William Chandler, Rm 3.119D, wchandler@law.utexas.edu.

European Court of Justice, Luxembourg: four-to-six-month clerkship with the European Court of Justice and the Court of First Instance of the European Communities. The clerkships are open to qualified second and third year law students and recent graduates with strong backgrounds in European or international law. A reading language of French is required for some internships, but not all. Non-U.S. citizens may apply for the internships, but only applicants with the right to return to work in the U.S. will be considered. Students may apply for an internship up to one year in advance. The clerkships run from September 20–December 20 and January 24–June 30. UT student participants are required to produce a substantial research paper, supervised by the Law School's international law faculty, as part of the clerkship. Participants in the clerkship will receive 6 to 10 hours of academic credit and airfare (or, for recent graduates, a modest stipend to assist with living expenses and airfare might be available). Applications for the clerkship normally will be accepted in February (for fall internships) and late (for spring internships). For further information, contact Professor Patricia Hansen, Rm. 3.119F, phansen@law.utexas.edu. Application forms are available from Dottie Lee, Rm 3.204, 232-1327, dlee@law.utexas.edu.

NOTE: STUDENTS ACCEPTED FOR THE ABOVE PROGRAMS WHO NEED ADDITIONAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE ARE ENTITLED TO APPLY FOR ASSISTANCE FROM THE FINANCIAL AID OFFICE. STUDENTS ACCEPTED FOR THE ABOVE PROGRAMS BY THE SPONSORING INSTITUTIONS WILL BE EXPECTED TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PROGRAM. STUDENTS MAY NOT WITHDRAW FROM CONSIDERATION ONCE NOMINATED BY THE LAW SCHOOL. STIPENDS PROVIDED BY THE LAW SCHOOL WILL DEPEND UPON THE NUMBER OF INTERNSHIPS AWARDED AND ANNUAL FUNDING AVAILABILITY.