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Death Penalty

Texas Assessment Team Releases Report on State’s Death Penalty System, Cites Urgent Need for Reform

The Texas Capital Punishment Assessment Team, organized by the American Bar Association (ABA), today issued a comprehensive report with recommendations to help ensure fairness and accuracy in the state’s death penalty system. “Evaluating Fairness and Accuracy in State Death Penalty Systems: The Texas Capital Punishment Assessment Report” is the culmination of a two-year review of […]


Capital Punishment Center to host symposium on “Mass Incarceration and the Death Penalty,” March 22–23, 2013

On March 22–23, 2013, the Capital Punishment Center at the University of Texas School of Law will sponsor a symposium on “Mass Incarceration and the Death Penalty.” Presentations will explore the possible connections between two current and much-discussed criminal justice phenomena: the United States’s disproportionately high rate of incarceration and its status as the only Western democracy that retains the death penalty.


Law School symposium to address lynching and the death penalty, March 23-24, 2012

“Lynching and the Death Penalty” will be held at the University of Texas School of Law on Friday and Saturday, March 23-24, 2012 in the Eidman Courtroom. The symposium will bring together leading scholars and advocates to explore the historical link between lynching and the death penalty, their similarities and differences, and the enduring role of lynching and race discrimination in contemporary capital litigation.


Jordan Steiker, Judge Robert M Parker Endowed Chair in Law

Professor Jordan Steiker in The New Republic discusses prospects for judicial abolition of the death penalty in the wake of Davis execution

Professor Jordan Steiker, Judge Robert M Parker Endowed Chair in Law and codirector of the Capital Punishment Center, and his sister, Carol Steiker, of Harvard Law School, have written an article in The New Republic arguing that opponents of the death penalty might be closer to reaching their goal of abolition than many think.


Jordan Steiker, Judge Robert M Parker Endowed Chair in Law

Professor Jordan Steiker in The New Republic discusses Governor Perry’s role in administering the Texas death penalty

Jordan Steiker, Judge Robert M Parker Endowed Chair in Law and codirector of the Law School’s Capital Punishment Center, has cowritten (with his sister, Carol Steiker of Harvard Law School) an article in The New Republic, “Don’t Blame Perry for Texas’s Execution Addiction. He Doesn’t Have Much to Do With It,” on Texas Governor Rick Perry’s role in administering capital punishment in Texas.