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Feb. 19, 2004

Press Contact: Katrin Flechsig, Room 3.269, 232-4857, kflechsig@mail.law.utexas.edu

International Public Law Internship Opportunities for UT Law Students

Democratization internships application deadline: Monday, March 1.
Independent international internships application deadline Tuesday, March 30.

AUSTIN, Texas—The University of Texas School of Law is currently accepting applications for the following two types of international internships: Democratization internships in Latin America, and independent public law international internships.


Democratization internships in Latin America

The University of Texas School of Law is currently accepting applications for democratization internships in Latin America (El Salvador, Colombia, Nicaragua, and Brazil) for the summer of 2004. The internships are for 12 weeks and are open to qualified first, second, or third year students with some background in international and/or Latin American law or affairs. A UT faculty member and a mentor on the relevant project's staff will jointly supervise the work of each student. All interns should be sufficiently proficient in Spanish (or in the case of Brazil, in either Spanish or Portuguese) to conduct research, correspond, and converse in the language. Participants in the Fellowships will receive six hours of academic credit and airfare. For those who are unable to accept academic credit, a modest stipend to assist with living expenses and airfare may be available.

Interns will be expected to provide their UT faculty advisor with monthly e-mail progress reports during the course of the internship. Academic credit will be awarded upon the intern's satisfactory completion of the internship requirements, based on the assessment of the UT faculty advisor and an evaluation from the interns project supervisor. Students seeking academic credit must pay tuition, and are also entitled to apply for financial aid.

Fellowships are available in each of the following countries:

San Salvador, El Salvador
Program: Legislative Modernization Program (up to three interns)

Description: This is a longstanding collaborative effort between the University of Texas and USAID to improve the quality and effectiveness of the legislative process in El Salvador by establishing a legislative assistance program for the national legislature. The program seeks to increase the legal resources available to legislators involved in policymaking, promote public participation in policy development, and promote and educate the public about the functions of the legislative body. UT law students work with interns from El Salvadoran universities to conduct comparative research and report to the legislative committees regarding both the laws of English-speaking countries and other countries in Latin America.3 During the summer of 2004, the legislature will be considering major reforms in three areas that will require law student assistance: a major overhaul of El Salvadors immigration laws; adoption of an anti-terrorism code being sponsored by the Organization of American States; and legislative implementation of the Central American Free Trade Agreement, which was recently adopted between the U.S. and Central American states, including El Salvador.

São Paulo, Brazil
Program: Environmental/Consumer Protection Democratization Program (up to two interns)

Description: Intern will work with the environmental division of the Office of the Attorney General of Brazil (under the supervision of Professor Antonio Benjamin) and with Law for a Green Planet Institute, a Brazilian non-governmental organization, on policy efforts to increase transparency and public access and control over environmental policy development in Brazil. Please note that Portuguese fluency is not required for this internship, as long as the intern is fluent in Spanish.

Bogotá, Colombia
Program: Judicial Modernization Project (up to two interns)

Description: Intern will work with a joint effort sponsored by USAID and Checchi Consulting, a private international development company with substantial experience in judicial modernization programs in Latin America. The project conducts a range of programs to strengthen the judiciary and the rule of law in Colombia, including efforts to develop public legal assistance and clinical programs, promotion of legal reforms on the Anglo-American adversarial model, and training of attorneys, law professors, and judges. A special security waiver is required to participate in this internship, due to the political instability in parts of Colombia.

Managua, Nicaragua
Program: Rule of Law/Criminal Justice Project (one intern)

Description: Intern will work with a joint effort sponsored by USAID and Checchi Consulting, a private international development company with substantial experience in judicial strengthening programs in Latin America. The project involves working with the Nicaraguan Attorney Generals Office and the Public Defenders Office (which is a branch of the Nicaraguan Supreme Court) to implement a major reform of the criminal code adopting an accusatory criminal justice system that was passed in December 2002. Applicants for this position should have a background and interest in criminal law.

Democracy Fellows applications should be submitted to Katrin Flechsig, Room 3.269 by Monday, March 1. To apply for an internship, please submit:

Information regarding security will be provided to interns during a pre-departure briefing. Any questions regarding the internships may be directed to Professor Sarah Cleveland at scleveland@mail.law.utexas.edu.

Students accepted for the above fellowships will be expected to participate in the fellowship program.

Stipends provided by the Law School will depend upon the number of fellowships awarded and funding availability. Funds are provided by a generous grant from the Cain Foundation.


Public international law internships

The Law School will award academic credit to allow students to participate in challenging public international law internships around the globe. Students may submit a proposal to the Law School's International Internship Committee to pursue a summer or semester-long internship with the governmental, intergovernmental, or non-governmental organization of their choice. Law students recently have pursued internships with the Office of the Legal Adviser at the U.S. State Department, the Court of International Trade in Washington, D.C., the UN Compensation Commission in Geneva, Switzerland, and La Red de Defensores Comunitarios in Chiapas, Mexico.

If the proposal is well structured and supervised, with rigorous legal content, the project will be assigned to be overseen by a member of the UT international law faculty, and the Law School will work with the student to obtain academic credit. Ordinarily 6 academic credits will be provided for a 12-week summer internship and 10 academic credits for a 6-month internship that also includes a substantial research paper supervised by the students UT law faculty advisor.

Interns will be expected to provide their UT faculty advisor with monthly e-mail progress reports during the course of the internship. Academic credit will be awarded upon the intern's satisfactory completion of the internship requirements, based on the assessment of the UT faculty advisor and an evaluation from the interns project supervisor. Students seeking academic credit must pay tuition, but remain eligible for financial aid.

Independent internship proposals for the summer or fall of 2004 should be submitted to Katrin Flechsig in Room 3.269 no later than March 30, 2004. The application should include the following:

For further information please contact Professor Karen Engle, Rm. 3.203, kengle@mail.law.utexas.edu.