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February 1, 2006

Press Contact:
Kirston Fortune, Assistant Dean for Communications, 512-471-7330.
Exhibit Contact: Kim Olson, Texas Law Review, (512) 232-1287.

Texas Law Review Symposium: Punishment Law & Policy, Feb. 3-4

Symposium is dedicated to the memory of UT Law Professor Robert O. Dawson

WHAT: Symposium’s scholars will present new approaches to criminal law.
WHEN: Fri., Feb. 3, from 1:15 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. and Sat., Feb. 4, from 9 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
WHERE:
Panel discussions will be held in the Eidman Courtroom, The University of Texas School of Law, 727 E. Dean Keeton St., Austin, Texas. For maps and directions go to: http://www.utexas.edu/law/about/parking.html
WHO: The public is invited to this free event.

AUSTIN, Texas — The Texas Law Review, along with University of Texas law professors Susan Klein and Jordan Steiker, will host a symposium entitled "Punishment Law & Policy" on Feb. 3-4. Dedicated to the memory of UT Law professor Robert O. Dawson, the symposium will take place in the Eidman Courtroom at the School of Law.

Dawson, who died last year, taught criminal law at the Law School for almost 40 years. For more than 20 of those years he also directed the Criminal Defense Clinic, which he co-founded. He also co-directed and co-founded the Actual Innocence Clinic at UT Law. As a reformer and scholar, Professor Dawson wrote extensively on criminal and juvenile law, with a particular emphasis on Texas criminal practice and procedure and Texas juvenile law. He also drafted much of the juvenile legislation enacted by the Texas legislature during the past 30 years.

"We're thrilled to host an event with some of the best criminal law scholars in the country,” said Steiker, who is a faculty sponsor for the Texas Law Review along with Klein. “The symposium is a fitting tribute to Bob Dawson because it explores topics of great interest to him -- the unprecedented growth of our nation's prison population, the administration of capital punishment, the effort to control discretion in non-capital sentencing, and alternative modes of punishment,” Steiker said. “Bob especially would have appreciated the participants' use of theory not in a purely abstract or philosophical sense, but rather to address the real world consequences of our system of punishment," he said.

At the symposium, national luminaries in the fields of criminal law, criminal procedure, criminology, and sociology will divide into four panels to present their current scholarship: (1) The Incarceration Revolution; (2) The Death Penalty in Practice; (3) The Operation and Reform of Sentencing Guidelines; and (4) Modern Crime Control Mechanisms.

The Texas Law Review will publish the proceedings of the conference in its annual symposium issue in June of 2006. For more information about the symposium, go to http://www.texaslawreview.org/symposium.

Below is a list of panels and presenters:

Panel 1: Incarceration Revolution; 1:30-3p.m. Fri., Feb. 3, Eidman Courtroom

Panel 2: Death Penalty in Practice; 3:15-4:45 p.m., Fri., Feb. 3, Eidman Courtroom

Panel 3: Operation and Reform of Sentencing Guidelines: 9-10:30 a.m., Sat. Feb. 4, Eidman Courtroom

Panel 4: Modern Crime Control Mechanisms: 10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m., Sat. Feb. 4, Eidman Courtroom

Related Links:
Texas Law Review 2006 Symposium: http://www.texaslawreview.org/symposium
Law School Statement and Photo Gallery for Robert Dawson: http://www.utexas.edu/law/news/2005/022605_dawson.html
In Memoriam: Professor Robert O. Dawson, 1939–2005: http://www.utexas.edu/law/news/2005/dawson_obituary.html