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May 8, 2006

Press Contact: Allegra Young, UT Law, (512) 471-7330.

Tax Professors Calvin Johnson and David Gamage Profiled

AUSTIN, Texas—Profiles of tax professors Calvin Johnson and David Gamage may be found at TaxProf Blog.

Gammage profile: http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2005/10/tax_prof_profil_2.html
Johnson profile: http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2006/05/calvin_h_johnso.html

About Professor Johnson

Calvin H. Johnson is the Andrews & Kurth Centennial Professor at UT Law. He received his undergraduate degree from Columbia College (Philosophy) and his law degree from Stanford. Before entering teaching, he was a tax lawyer with Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton and Garrison in New York City and with the U.S. Department of Treasury in Washington, D.C. He has been Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution in Washington, a member of the IRS Commissioner's Advisory Group and of the Academic Advisers on the Tax System to the U.S. Congress Joint Committee on Taxation. He has served as Chairman of the American Bar Association Tax Section Committee on Tax Structure and Simplification and as Chairman of the American Association of Law School, Tax Section.

Johnson's Righteous Anger at the Wicked States: The Meaning of the Founders Constitution (Cambridge University Press 2005) is a history of the adoption of the Constitution in terms of what the Founders were attempting to accomplish. The following website has some reviews and related matter: http://www.utexas.edu/law/faculty/calvinjohnson/RighteousAnger/. In the constitutional law area, Professor Johnson has also recently published "The Panda's Thumb: The Modest and Mercantilist Orginal Meaning of the Commerce Clause," 13 William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal 1 (2004); "Fixing the Constitutional Absurdity of the Apportionment of Direct Tax," 21 Constitutional Commentary 2 (2004); "Homage to Clio: the Historical Continuity from the Articles of Confederation into the Constitution," 20 Constitutional Commentary 463 (2004).

In the tax area, Professor Johnson recently testified before the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations Hearings on the U.S. Tax Shelter Industry and he published "Tales from the KPMG’s Skunk Works: The Basis-Shift or Defective-Redemption Shelter," 108 Tax Notes 431 (2005). Other recent tax publications include "Can the IRS be Well-Liked?, Review of Charles Rossotti’s Many Unhappy Returns," 108 Tax Notes 145 (2005); "The Incredible Shrinking Domain of Corporate Stock," 103 Tax Notes 871 (2004); "Stock and Stock-Option Compensation: A Bad Idea" 51 Canadian Tax J.1259 (2003); "Depreciation Policy During Carnival: The New 50 Percent Bonus Depreciation," 100 Tax Notes 712 (2003); "Destroying Tax Base: The Proposed INDOPCO Capitalization Regulations," 99 Tax Notes1381 (2003); "A Thermometer for the Tax System: The Overall Health of the Tax System as Measured by Implicit Tax," 56 SMU L. Rev.13 (2003); "The Bush 35 Percent Flat Tax on Distributions from Public Corporations," 98 Tax Notes 1881 (2003).

About Professor Gamage

David Gamage joined the UT Law faculty in 2005 as an Emerging Scholars Program Assistant Professor. Professor Gamage has an MA in Organizational Sociology from Stanford University and a JD from Yale, where he served on the Yale Law Journal. Professor Gamage primarily writes in the field of tax law, with a focus on the tax lawmaking process. As secondary areas of research, he also studies administrative law, contract law, campaign finance, and legislation. During the 2005-2006 academic year, Professor Gamage taught Federal Income Taxation and a seminar on Tax Policy. During the 2006-2007 academic year, he will teach Corporate Taxation and a seminar on Tax Policy.

Related Links:
Professor Johnson's Webpage: http://www.utexas.edu/law/faculty/chj7107/
Professor Gamage's Webpage: http://www.utexas.edu/law/faculty/dg3739/