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October 1, 2007

Five Students named Public Service Scholars with the William Wayne Justice Center for Public Interest Law at UT Law

UT Law’s Public Service Scholars
UT Law’s Public Service Scholars (left to right) Lisa Snead, Meghan Shapiro, Kate Lincoln-Goldfinch, Aron Israelite, Whitney Hill

Five students have been selected to serve as Public Service Scholars for 2007—2008 with the William Wayne Justice Center for Public Interest Law at The University of Texas School of Law.

The Law School awards scholarships each year to a group of outstanding students with a demonstrated commitment to studying, promoting, and working in public service. Each Scholar receives a $5,000 scholarship and works closely with the Justice Center on public service initiatives.

“This year’s Scholars were selected from more than twenty applicants who demonstrate strong academic credentials and a remarkable dedication to public service,” said Eden Harrington, Director of the Justice Center. “We look forward to working with these outstanding students.”

The following students were selected as the 2007—2008 Public Service Scholars:

Whitney Hill, ’09, a magna cum laude graduate of Claremont McKenna College, is co-chair of Concerned Students for LRAP, a volunteer teacher for Street Law, and a member of the Public Interest Law Society. She spent last summer clerking for Texas RioGrande Legal Aid. This year she will work with Advocacy, Inc. helping to represent children with disabilities suffering from abuse and neglect. Hill has been a volunteer with Big Brothers/Big Sisters for several years and plans a career addressing children’s legal needs.

Aron Israelite, ’09, a summa cum laude graduate of the University of Massachusetts, is co-chair of Concerned Students for LRAP, a staff editor for the Texas Law Review, and active in Texas Law Fellowships, the American Constitution Society, and the Public Interest Law Association. He currently participates in the National Security and Human Rights Clinic. Last summer, Israelite worked for the Texas Civil Rights Project. His career goal is to run a non-profit that combines legal advocacy with grassroots community organizing.

Kate Lincoln-Goldfinch, ’08, a graduate of UT Austin, is a member of the Texas Journal on Civil Liberties and Civil Rights and the Women’s Law Caucus, and has participated in the Immigration Clinic. After her first year, Lincoln-Goldfinch clerked for the Texas Advocacy Project, working on appeals for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. During the last legislative session, she interned for State Representative Juan Garcia. She worked for the Political Asylum Project of Austin last summer, and she will continue her work there this year. Lincoln-Goldfinch hopes to pursue a career in immigration law.

Meghan Shapiro, ’09, a graduate of the College of William and Mary, participates in the Capital Punishment Clinic and is active in Concerned Students for LRAP and the American Constitution Society. Before attending law school, Shapiro participated in the ABA’s Death Penalty Moratorium Project. She worked last summer on capital cases for the Texas Defender Service and the Equal Justice Initiative of Alabama. She will continue her work with TDS during the school year. Upon graduation, she plans to continue working to defend those facing the death penalty.

Lisa Snead, ’09, a cum laude graduate of the College of William and Mary, is vice president of the Domestic Violence Survivor Support Network, staff editor of the Review of Litigation, and active in the Public Interest Law Association. Before attending law school, Snead worked as an intern assisting victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. Last summer she worked for the Newport News Court Appointed Special Advocates and served as a special advocate for eight children. After law school, she plans to work for an organization that aids victims of family violence.

About the Justice Center:

The William Wayne Justice Center at UT Law is dedicated to promoting equal justice for all through legal education. The Justice Center works toward this goal by educating students and attorneys about public interest issues through conferences, research projects, and clinical courses; by encouraging all students to participate in pro bono and public interest law throughout their careers; and by creating public service opportunities for students and graduates.

Related Link: William Wayne Justice Center for Public Interest Law:
http://www.utlawjusticecenter.com

Contact: Eden Harrington, Director of the William Wayne Justice Center for Public Interest Law, UT Law, 512-232-7068, eharrington@law.utexas.edu.