The University of Texas at Austin   School of Law

Main menu:

Spring 2012 - Preservation Law

Rawlins, Rachael

Unique # 29398 Credit Hours: 3 Course ID: 379M
DayTimeLocation
TTH9:30 - 11:00 amSUT 3.112
No exam information is available for this class.
Registration Information
This course is restricted to upper division students only.

Description
Preservation Law and Cultural Resource Management
Instructor:  Rachael Rawlins

Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to legal, advocacy and public policy issues in the field of historic and cultural preservation.  It provides a practical understanding of the institutional framework which governs preservation practice in the U.S. 

Part I explores federal statutory laws affecting preservation policy and practice, including the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Department of Transportation Act (Section 4(f)).  Part II looks at state and local laws created to further preservation.  Part III explores the opportunities and constraints for preservation practice created by constitutional law.  Part IV reviews laws protecting archeological resources including common law doctrines, federal, state, local, and international law. 

Course Requirements

1.  Assigned readings and participation in class
Every student is expected to come to class prepared to discuss the reading assignment; students will be assigned days to be the "expert" of the day, in rotation.  Depending on local issues of interest, there may be a visit to a City of Austin Landmarks Commission hearing or City Council.  (20%)

2.  Three quizzes, (10% each)

3.  Local Ordinance Analysis (20%)
Each student will be asked to obtain a local historic preservation ordinance along with any relevant regulations or other guidelines, and to interview city staff and/or Landmarks Commission members.  Each student will be asked to prepare a short written analysis and oral presentation on his/her local ordinance in terms of its content and perceived effectiveness. 

4.  Final (30%)


Related Course Areas