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Fall 2014 - Seminar: Global Challenges: Strategy, Law, & Diplomacy

Adelman, David E
Suri, Jeremi

Credit Hours: 3  Course ID: 397S  Unique # 29940

Meeting Day(s)TimeLocation
W2:00 - 5:00 pmSRH 3.221
Exam Type  Date Time      Name Range Regular Room Extegrity Room
Paper
Registration Information
This course is restricted to upper division students only.
You must have at least 43 credit hours to register.

Description
Although often separated, the global challenges of our contemporary world have many connections and parallels.  They also share common histories that inform contemporary problems and possible opportunities for meaningful reforms.  This course will emphasize the value of comparative analysis in framing, analyzing, and addressing contemporary global challenges through strategic analysis, law, and diplomacy.  The course will focus on three global challenges:  (1) international human rights, including immigration, genocide, human trafficking, and gender discrimination; (2) conventional and nuclear arms control since the First World War; and (3) emerging efforts to address climate change and other transnational environmental problems. 

This will be an intensive reading course, emphasizing critical reading, comparative analysis, and group discussion.  The assigned readings will include conceptual, legal, and historical materials to provide a comparative framework for examining bilateral and multilateral diplomacy, the striking range of legal mechanisms, and the surrounding strategic contexts.  This graduate seminar will bring together students from Law, Public Affairs, History, Political Science, and Middle East Studies.  The course will be co-taught by Professor David E.  Adelman, at the Law School, and Professor Jeremi Suri, who has cross-appointments in Public Affairs and History, and a courtesy appointment in Middle East Studies.  Grading will be based on class participation, weekly one-page response papers, and a final 20-page research paper on a topic related to the class, chosen in consultations between each student and the professors.

Related Course Areas
Textbooks
No materials required