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The University of Texas at Austin

Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs



Renaming of U.S. Education Building Honors Johnson's Education Legacy

President George W. Bush poses with his wife, First Lady Laura Bush, and President Lyndon B. Johnson's daughters Linda and Luci, after signing legislation naming the U.S. Department of Education Headquarters in Washington D.C. as the Lyndon Baines Johnson Federal Building
President George W. Bush poses with his wife, First Lady Laura Bush, and President Lyndon B. Johnson's daughters Linda and Luci, after signing legislation naming the U.S. Department of Education Headquarters in Washington D.C. as the Lyndon Baines Johnson Federal Building

The U.S. Congress has approved and President George W. Bush has signed, legislation naming the U.S. Department of Education headquarters building after former President Lyndon B. Johnson.

The bill sponsored by Rep. Gene Green, D-Houston, officially renames the headquarters the Lyndon Baines Johnson Federal Building.

"Education was at the heart of my father's career in public service. He felt that it was mankind's passport out of poverty and our greatest hope for tomorrow," said daughter Luci Baines Johnson, who was present at the signing ceremony.

Green said no building in the national capital area has been named for Johnson, who served as president from 1963-69 and died in 1973. Meanwhile, the International Trade Center in downtown Washington bears Ronald Reagan's name and the Central Intelligence Agency complex in Virginia has been named after former President George. H.W. Bush.

Johnson signed dozens of education-related bills into law, including a 1964 law that established Head Start, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, which provided assistance to underfunded school districts and the Higher Education Act of 1965.

Of course, perhaps President Johnson's most lasting educational contribution was the establishment of the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin for the purpose of training future generations of policymakers.