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The University of Texas at Austin

Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs



The Making of the National Security Council of Japan

The Yomimuri Shimbun, June 30, 2007

Japanese and U.S. national security specialists met earlier this month to discuss the importance of establishing a national security council in this country as a key government organ charged with integrating and coordinating diplomatic and security policies.

A symposium focusing on "The Making of the National Security Council of Japan—Refining Strategy: Lessons Japan Can Learn from the U.S. NSC" also discussed the tasks to be tackled in setting up a Japanese version of the U.S. National Security Council.

The event, organized by the Yomiuri Research Institute and cosponsored by the Office of Public Policy Seminar at Tokyo University Graduate School of Public Policy, was held in the Yayoi Auditorium's Ichijo Hall at Tokyo University's Yayoi Campus on June 19.

The four panelists were Ken Sato, deputy chairman of the Institute for International Policy Studies and former administrative vice defense minister; Robert Blackwill, former deputy national security adviser to U.S. President George W. Bush and president of Barbour Griffith & Rogers, International; James Steinberg, former deputy national security adviser to U.S. President Bill Clinton and dean of The Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas; and Shinichi Kitaoka, a professor of Japanese political and foreign relations history at Tokyo University.

View part one at the Yomiuri Shimbun

View part two at the Yomiuri Shimbun

Copyright 2007 The Yomimuri Shimbun