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Bridging Policy and Research: LBJ School Faculty and Centers Inform Today’s Complex Issues at APPAM National Conference

Four LBJ School faculty members and three research staff members are slated to speak and present research at the annual Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) conference Nov. 3 through 5 in Washington, D.C.

Angela Evans, Clinical Professor in Public Policy Practice, serves on the APPAM Policy Council, which serves as the organization’s board of directors.

“APPAM is the principle association for those involved in policy analysis, research, and management,” said Evans. “Its mission is to improve public policy management by fostering excellence in research, analysis, and education, and APPAM supports a strong network for those who not only undertake research but also for those who are policymakers.”

This year’s conference theme is “Seeking Solutions to Complex Policy and Management Problems.”

According to APPAM, “Today’s complex policy issues are characterized by changing constraints, greater uncertainty, multiple causes and frequently span political jurisdictions and national boundaries. Examples include poverty, migration, climate change, and access to fresh water. Interdependencies such as scarce energy resources, slow economic growth, evolving technologies, and inter-sectoral governance structures complicate the search for solutions. To succeed in this environment, policymakers and managers must define problems in ways that acknowledge multiple perspectives, interdependencies, and the likelihood of unintended consequences.”

With that in mind, LBJ School faculty and representatives from the Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources (RMC) and the Center for Health and Social Policy (CHASP) submitted research papers that address this theme.

Chris King, Director of the RMC, and Carolyn Heinrich, Director of CHASP, co-authored a paper “How Effective Are Workforce Development Programs? Implications for U.S. Workforce Policies Beyond the Great Recession.” Heinrich also just completed a term as Chair of the Institutional Representatives and a stint on the APPAM Executive Committee.

Below is a full list of papers and faculty and staff participants in this year’s APPAM conference.

Thursday, Nov. 3:

11 AM – 3 PM
“From Research to Policy: Informing the Policy Debate”
Roundtable featuring Angela Evans, Clinical Professor of Public Policy Practice, The LBJ School of Public Affairs

Friday, Nov. 4:

9:30 – 11 AM
Session: Improving Evidence on Workforce Development Program Performance for Policymakers
Paper: “How Effective Are Workforce Development Programs? Implications for U.S. Workforce Policies Beyond the
Great Recession”
Author(s): Christopher T. King, Director of the Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources and Carolyn J. Heinrich, Director of the Center for Health and Social Policy

1 – 2:30 PM
Session: Social Safety Net Transitions to Employment: Policy Analysis of Great Recessions
Paper: “Interactions between SNAP and UI before and during the Great Recession”
Author(s): Daniel Schroeder, The Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources

Paper: “Evidence on the Implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Workforce Development and Unemployment Insurance Provisions”
Author(s): Christopher T. King, Director of the Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources with others

Saturday, Nov. 5:

8:30 – 10 AM
“The Disappointing Post-Recession Employment Situation”
Roundtable featuring Carolyn J. Heinrich, Director of the Center for Health and Social Policy

10:30 AM – 12 PM
Session: The Prospects and Promise of Two-Generation Anti-Poverty Programs
Paper: “Opportunities and Challenges Confronting Dual-Generation Strategies: Achieving Larger, More Lasting Impacts from Declining Resources”
Author(s): Christopher T. King, Director of the Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources, Robert W. Glover, The Ray Marshall Center, and Tara C. Smith, The Ray Marshall Center

12 – 1:30 PM
Session: Policy Implications of Teacher Evaluation & Performance
Paper: “Can Teacher Incentive Pay Increase Student Performance on Standardized Tests?”
Author(s): Jane Lincove, Assistant Professor of Public Affairs