Skip Navigation

LBJ School Welcomes Seven New Faces to the LBJ Community

AUSTIN, Texas-- Aug. 21, 2009-- The Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs welcomes seven new faces to the LBJ community, including Ethan B. Kapstein, one of the world’s foremost scholars in international economic relations; Angela M. Evans, former Deputy Director of the Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress;  Benedicte Callan, the Head of the Biotechnology Unit for the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD); and William R. Stewart, who most recently served as Minister Counselor for Economic and Political Affairs at the United States Embassy in Cairo, joins the LBJ School as Diplomat in Residence.

Rounding out the additions to the LBJ School this fall are: Lawrence Graham, a professor of government in the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas at Austin; Harrison Keller, Vice Provost of Higher Education Policy and Research at the University of Texas at Austin; James Olson, a professor at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M, all of whom will be teaching fall seminars.

Ethan Kapstein

Ethan B. Kapstein

Ethan B. Kapstein joins the LBJ School as a Tom Slick Professorship in International Affairs and is offering two seminars in the Spring 2010 semester, one on economic development and the other on the economics of national security. Additionally, Kapstein has received an appointment at the McCombs School of Business and will hold the Dennis O’Connor Regent’s Professorship in Business for 2009-2010.

Recently named Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS) in Washington, DC, Kapstein holds the INSEAD Chair in Political Economy at INSEAD, the international business school with campuses in Fontainebleau, France, Singapore, and Abu Dhabi. Kapstein is also a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Global Development in Washington and with the French Institute of International Relations in Paris. Previously, Kapstein was Stassen Professor of International Peace at the University of Minnesota, Vice President of the Council on Foreign Relations, Principal Administrator at the OECD, and Executive Director of the Economics and National Security Program at Harvard University.

A former international banker and retired U.S. naval officer, Kapstein has published widely in professional and policy journals and is a frequent contributor to the op-ed pages of leading newspapers. He is the author or editor of eight books, the most recent of which are Economic Justice in an Unfair World (Princeton 2006) and The Fate of Young Democracies (Cambridge 2008, with Nathan Converse). Kapstein has been a consultant to many private and public sector organizations, including the World Bank and OECD and has been a visiting professor at Sciences Po in Paris, the University of Nice, the National Institute for Defense Studies in Tokyo and the National War College in Washington, D.C. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and of the International House of Japan.

Angela M. Evans

Angela M. Evans

Angela M. Evans, who joins the LBJ School as a Clinical Professor in Public Policy Practice,  has served as the Deputy Director of the Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, for the past 13 years. She will be teaching "Addressing Public Policy in the 21st Century" and Public Management. Evans  joined CRS in 1971 as an analyst in its Education and Public Welfare Division and subsequently was named head of the Division's Education Section, where she supervised CRS’ research and analysis for Congress in education and training policy. Prior to her appointment as Deputy Director of CRS, Evans served as Director of the Library’s Congressional Relations Office and advisor to the Librarian of Congress as well as Associate Director for Research and Coordination in CRS. As Deputy Director of CRS, Evans organized and led initiatives aimed at improving CRS operations and better serving its congressional clients. She oversaw the development of research agendas which integrated the various disciplines and subject matter experts within CRS and exploited new technology to provide Congress enhanced access to the full range of CRS expertise. Evans also led a multi-year effort to revamp first-line management in CRS to insure more effective research management and supply a pool of successor managers for the CRS of the future.

In addition to her duties at the Congressional Research Service, Evans has served as an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland, School of Public Policy, a senior fellow at the School of Public Policy and Social Research at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a member of the Board of Visitors for the Evans School of Public Affairs at the University of Washington. She also serves as a Member of the Policy Board of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. She also directs the overall operations of CRS including: agency performance; budget formulation and execution; workforce planning and development; research technology design and architecture; and the procurement and access to information resources.

Benedicte Callan

Benedicte Callan

Benedicte Callan, the Head of the Biotechnology Unit for the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), joins the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs research team as a Sid Richardson Fellow focusing on health policy and innovation and as a research affiliate of the Center for Health and Social Policy (CHASP).

Previously, Callan worked for 12 years at the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) where she served as Principal Administrator of Health for the Biotechnology Division and most recently, Head of the Biotechnology Unit.  At the OECD, Callan had practical experience in building international consensus on good policy practice in a broad range of science, innovation and economic policy issues related to biotechnology’s applications to industry, health and the environment.  Her most recent publications focus on health and innovation policy in OECD countries and meeting global health goals.  Over 2009-2010, she will work on a project about policies, which support knowledge networks and markets for biomedical data.  

Callan has worked extensively on high tech trade, intellectual property rights policy, and innovation policy. Prior to the OECD, Callan was a Fellow for Political Economy at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.  Callan received her PhD from the University of California-Berkley in Political Science in 1995 and her BA from Yale University in Biology and East Asian Studies.

Bill Stewart

William R. "Bill" Stewart

William Stewart joins the LBJ School as Diplomat in Residence, primarily responsible for education and recruitment for the U.S. State Department. Stewart will also be teaching a section of U.S. Diplomacy in the spring semester.  Stewart, is a career member of the Senior Foreign Service, and most recently served as Minister Counselor for Economic and Political Affairs at the United States Embassy in Cairo from August 2006 to July 2009. As Minister Counselor, Stewart  was the senior economic and political advisor to the Ambassador, and a key member of her core Country Team. Prior to this assignment, Stweart served as Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in Muscat, Oman from January 2004 to June 2006. From June 2003 to December 2003, Stewart served in Iraq under the auspices of the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA), first as a political advisor to the Regional Coordinator for CPA-North in Erbil, and then as CPA Governorate Coordinator for Salah ad Din Governorate, based in Tikrit. Previously, he served as Chief of the Political-Economic Section at the U.S. Embassy in Muscat from June 2000 to June 2003. Stewart joined the Foreign Service in 1984 and has also served in Stockholm, Muscat, Montreal, Sana'a, and Dubai. He was a John L. Weinberg fellow at Princeton University for the 1999-2000 academic year, earning a master’s degree in public policy.

Lawrence Graham

Lawrence Graham

Lawrence Graham, a professor of government in the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas at Austin, is teaching a fall seminar titled “Regionalism, Conflict and Intergovernmental Relations in Today’s World,” and a spring course titled “Development Policy and Management Issues.” Professor Graham's fields of specialization are development policy and comparative politics, with regional concentrations in Latin America (his primary area of interest) and southern Europe. A recipient of various external grants and awards (e.g., Fulbright, National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences, International Research and Exchanges Board, and Ford), he has conducted field work on a regular basis in Latin America and southern Europe over the past 35 years. His publications have focused on bureaucratic politics and public policy in developing areas such as Brazil and Portugal. Representative of his scholarship are The State and Policy Outcomes in Latin America (1990), The Political Economy of Brazil (1990) and The Portuguese Military and the State (1993).

Harrison Keller

Harrison Keller

Harrison Keller, Vice Provost of Higher Education Policy and Research at the University of Texas at Austin and an officer in the United States Navy Reserve, is teaching a fall seminar titled “Policy Issues in Higher Education.”

Prior to coming to UT Austin, Keller served as director of research for the Texas House of Representatives and senior education policy analyst for the speaker of the Texas House.  He is an appointed board member of the Prepaid Higher Education Tuition Board that oversees the state college savings plans, has worked with leaders from both parties to develop and pass major education budget and policy proposals for the state of Texas, and frequently works with state policymakers, foundations, and national organizations on public and higher education policy issues.  His research interests include education policy and finance, moral philosophy, and democratic deliberation.  He has taught at Georgetown University, St. Edward’s University, and the University of Texas at Austin.  Keller holds a bachelors degree in philosophy with honors from the University of Notre Dame and a Master’s degree and Ph.D. from Georgetown University.  He and his wife, Gena Nivens Keller, live in Austin with their children, William and Elizabeth.

James Olson

James Olson

James Olson, a professor at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M, is teaching a seminar titled “The Role of Intelligence in National Security” during the fall semester. Professor Olson received his law degree from the University of Iowa in 1969. He is a Senior Lecturer at the Bush School, where he teaches courses on intelligence, national security, and international crisis management. He served for over 25 years in the Directorate of Operations of the Central Intelligence Agency, mostly overseas in clandestine operations. In addition to several foreign assignments, he was Chief of Counterintelligence at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia. Professor Olson has been awarded the Intelligence Medal of Merit, the Distinguished Career Intelligence Medal, the Donovan Award, and several Distinguished Service Citations. He is the recipient of awards from the Bush School and the Association of Former Students for excellence in teaching. Professor Olson is the author of "Fair Play: The Moral Dilemmas of Spying", published by Potomac Books in 2006.