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Best Solution, Right Cost: An Insider's Guide to Vendor Relations

Date(s): October 25, 2012
Time: Please arrive between 7:30 and 7:45 for check-in. This is a 1 day class. Class will start at 8 am and end at 5 pm.
Prerequisites: None
Credit Hours: 8
Registration Fee: $295.00
Location:

This class will be held at the SPI Offices - Barton Oaks Plaza One, Suite #100 - 901 S. Mopac Expressway. 

A map and directions to the location may be found at the website: 

www.spartnerships.com/contact_main.html

Registration:

Sorry, this class has already ended.

This program is dedicated to providing assistance to mid- and upper-level management teams who want to attract outstanding contractors and then ensure successful procurements.

Successful procurements and partnerships result when public officials and vendors both have a complete understanding of the objectives and all stakeholders are willing to make a total commitment to the project. This class curriculum was not designed to teach basic technical procurement skills, it was designed to focus instead on the big and small decisions that shape procurement outcomes. The focus is on what it takes to ensure totally successful projects with exactly the right partners.

An improved understanding of private sector culture and how corporate decisions are made about which procurements their teams will pursue will lead to more competition and better bid documents. This program focuses on the critical aspects of the procurement process primarily from the commercial vendors’ perspective and is taught by consultants who have considerable experience working both in the public and private sectors. This course was also developed with extensive input from vendors, government procurement experts, and sales executives who sell to government.

 

Who Should Attend?
This course is intended for anyone involved with commercial bidding and procurement processes, especially:
• Division/management team members
• Proposal development team members
• Financial and business operations personnel
• Executive and project sponsors
• Contract managers
• Proposal evaluation team members

 

Examples of some of the questions that will be answered:

1. What is the first question most vendors ponder when a bid document is publicized?

2. What is the best way to ensure that communications with vendors is fair and transparent?

3. What factors do failed procurements have in common?

4. What can I do to reduce public information requests?

5. What can I learn from meeting with vendors when a procurement is being planned?

6. What are the most common reasons vendors choose not to bid on a project?

7. How can I create contracts that allow for innovation?

8. Which vendor employee is my best advocate?

9. Why would vendors think some government procurements are more difficult than others?

10. What information do vendors want that is not included in most procurement documents?