Skip Navigation

LBJ School Courses Overseas

The LBJ School plans to offer at least one course each year outside the United States, usually an intensive three-credit-hour course offered over the course of three weeks during the summer. The opportunity to study important global policy subject-matter in an applied setting – seeing the challenges first-hand, meeting people from different cultures and educational backgrounds – can have a profound impact on students who aspire to become the next generation of leaders in public service, non-governmental organizations, and multinational businesses. Students in these overseas courses can augment their classroom experiences through field trips and service opportunities.

The School strives to schedule the courses to allow students to complete their internship requirements during the same summer that they take the course. Some students will be able to combine the travel to an overseas course with their travel to the worksite for an international internship -- e.g., some students will follow the May 2010 course in South Africa with a summer 2010 internship working in Africa.


Students Sara McTarnaghan, Katie Casstevens, Francoise Van Keuren and Jesse Madden read to children on a boat operated by an NGO called Luz na Amazonia that provides health service to small villages along a tributary of the Amazon River.
Students Sara McTarnaghan, Katie Casstevens, Francoise Van Keuren and Jesse Madden read to children on a boat operated by an NGO called Luz na Amazonia that provides health service to small villages along a tributary of the Amazon River.
Rising Powers & Global Governance in Brazil

Leaders around the world confront new policy challenges in key areas of complex global governance such as efforts to respond to environmental degradation, to maintain efficient (and perhaps fair) rules for international economic interaction, and to deal with new threats to public health like HIV/AIDS.  On these issues, collective action among countries is required to address threats or capitalize on opportunities, and both traditional and new organizations (civil society / NGOs and private, for-profit firms) challenge the power and appropriate role of the state.  At the same time, the economic rise of new powers, notably the so-called BRICS, raises questions about whether the traditional global leaders can handle the challenges alone but also offers some hope for new initiatives to address governance challenges in new ways. This course aims to provide students with a broad survey of the role of rising powers in global governance and to show first-hand the implications of the rising powers’ activities: traveling to Brazil will enable students to discuss these issues directly with government officials and thought leaders in a critical rising power and to see the challenges confronting governance in these countries for themselves.

More...

 


Environment & Development in the Middle East

This course focuses on the natural and human environment, primarily in Israel but also among its neighbors (Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, the Palestinian Authority and Egypt). This course addresses major environmental topics such as water quantity, water quality, air quality, solid wastes, hazardous materials, protection of natural areas and endangered species, land management, human population, wildlife, energy, and natural resources.

More...

 


Annual Hiroshima Peace Memorial Ceremony
Annual Hiroshima Peace Memorial Ceremony

Development Within a Low Carbon World: Preparing Professionals for Post-Kyoto Climate Negotiations and Sustainable Growth Policies

This course prepares professionals for post-Kyoto climate negotiations. Its two components focus on the sustainable development issues associated with adoption of low-carbon-emissions technologies and policies in developing countries and on developing countries' negotiating strategies and participation in the global climate regime. The course is taught by UT faculty from the LBJ School and the School of Law along with a group of international experts and Japanese government officials. At the invitation of the Japanese government, a number of government officials from developing countries will join the UT students in the classroom.

More...

 


Governance Challenges in Southern Africa
Professor Josh Busby talks with Rosie, who sells mieliepap, peanut-butter toast, and other simple fare for a few cents per serving to about 300 students and unemployed workers each day. Rosie’s kitchen is in an informal settlement in Kayelitsha.
Professor Josh Busby talks with Rosie, who sells mieliepap, peanut-butter toast, and other simple fare for a few cents per serving to about 300 students and unemployed workers each day. Rosie’s kitchen is in an informal settlement in Kayelitsha.

Southern Africa contains the continent’s richest country and a number of its poorest. The region has had a tragic history of colonial and minority rule, of civil war and strife. New challenges threaten the sub-continent's emergence from these shadows, including HIV/AIDS, environmental degradation, weak national identities, and the failure of liberation movements to deliver political and economic development. At the same time, the region is home to some of the continent's most dynamic economies and rich cultural and environmental heritage. The course will survey governance challenges in southern Africa, focusing on political and economic development, private security as both a challenge and a solution to crime and instability, public health (especially HIV/AIDS), and environmental protection.

More...