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Publishing Groups

As a Webmaster, you might manage dozens of directories and hundreds of files, and you might want to share maintenance responsibility of a particular subdirectory and its files with other staff. For example, there might be a newsletter subdirectory in your publishing area, and you might want to share its upkeep with the newsletter's editor.

To do this, a server administrator must create a publishing group for you.

Note: this service is available only to official publishers in academic and administrative units who publish from the central server, UTS.

Request a Publishing Group

Before you request a group, every person you want in that group must have logged into UTS and changed their login name. And, you must know their login names (but not passwords). When you have this information, fill out the request a publishing group (requires UT EID) form. You will be notified through e-mail when the group has been created, usually within 3-5 work days. You can also use this form to modify an existing group by either adding or removing members.

Change Group Affiliation/Permissions

Once you receive notice that the group has been created, you should change the group affiliation of the file(s) or directory(s) that the group will be managing.

  1. Log in to UTS.
  2. Go to your publishing directory (cd ~www/mydir).
  3. Then type the commands shown below.
chgrp group-name filename Changes group affiliation of filename to group-name
chgrp -R group-name dirname Changes group affiliation of dirname and all files within
dirname
to group-name
Note: You must own the file or directory you want to change and you must belong to the group you are changing it to. Every file and directory on UTS automatically has an owner and a group affiliation. You can see those affiliations by typing the ls -al command.

You should also give the group write privileges to that file or directory:

chmod g+w filename Gives the group write privileges to filename. Any member of the group
affiliated with filename can change or delete the file. Use g-w to remove
group write privileges.
chmod -R g+w dirname Gives the group write privileges to all files within dirname. Any member
of the group affiliated with dirname can change or delete any file within
dirname
. Use g-w to remove group write privileges.
Note: You must own the file or directory you want to change.


  Updated 2004 July 14
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