Spring 2006 enrollment figures show increased minority student representation

Feb. 15, 2006

AUSTIN, Texas—Spring 2006 enrollment at The University of Texas at Austin reflected increases in the percentage of African American, Hispanic and American Indian students compared to spring 2005, according to a preliminary enrollment analysis by the university’s Office of Institutional Research.

The increases include 5.7 percent more African Americans, 5.3 percent more Hispanics and 4.7 percent more American Indian students than in spring 2005. The numbers of students in these ethnic groups for spring 2006 include 6,690 Hispanics (an increase of 337), 1,741 African Americans (an increase of 94) and 202 American Indians (an increase of nine).

The enrollment of 26,644 white students in spring 2006 reflects a 4.1 percent decrease (1,137 fewer) compared to spring 2005. The 6,772 Asian American enrollment figure represents a decrease of 0.5 percent (31 fewer). The 4,072 foreign student total is a 1.6 percent decrease (68 fewer). The ethnicity of 424 students is listed as undetermined.

University-wide, the proportional representation of students in spring 2006 is:

  • 57.2 percent white (from 58.6 percent in spring 2005)
  • 0.4 percent American Indian (unchanged)
  • 3.7 percent African American (3.5 percent)
  • 14.5 percent Asian American (14.3 percent)
  • 14.4 percent Hispanic (13.4 percent)
  • 8.7 percent foreign (unchanged)
  • 0.9 percent unknown (1.1 percent)

Maryann Ruddock, associate vice president and director of institutional research, said these data are preliminary 12th class day numbers and that another analysis will be prepared when final figures are available.

The preliminary figures show enrollment at The University of Texas at Austin dropped this spring to 46,545 from 47,444 in spring 2005. The decreased spring 2006 enrollment is a result of a plan proposed by a Task Force on Enrollment Strategy that includes increasing the size of the faculty while reducing the student population. The goal is to achieve a better student/faculty ratio.

Spring 2006 enrollment includes 34,398 undergraduates, 10,499 graduate and 1,648 special professional enrollment (Law and Pharm. D.) students. Undergraduate enrollment decreased by 495 students (1.4 percent), graduate enrollment decreased by 296 students (2.7 percent), and special professional enrollment (Law and Pharm. D.) decreased by 108 students (6.2 percent).

Overall, graduate enrollment (excluding special professional) decreased by 296 students (2.7 percent). There was a 13-student increase (4.5 percent) in new graduate student enrollment and 14-student (11.2 percent) increase in re-entering students. There was a decrease in continuing students (323 or 3.1 percent). Graduate enrollment (including special professional) decreased or remained stable in all colleges except the School of Architecture, which showed a slight increase (2.4 percent). The largest numeric decrease was for the McCombs School of Business with 166. The decrease in the College of Natural Sciences was because of the transfer of geological sciences into the Jackson School of Geosciences. If geological sciences had remained in the College of Natural Sciences, the college would have shown an increase in graduate student enrollment over spring 2005, according to the report.

For more information contact: Robert D. Meckel, Office of Public Affairs, The University of Texas at Austin, 512-475-7847.