Experts Available to Discuss Fort Hood Tragedy

Nov. 6, 2009

AUSTIN, Texas — One hundred miles from Fort Hood, The University of Texas at Austin has various experts available to discuss aspects of Thursday's shooting. This list will continue to grow. For the most updated version, please visit http://www.utexas.edu/news/2009/11/06/fort_hood.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Howard Prince
Clinical Professor, LBJ School of Public Affairs
512-471-4303
hprince@mail.utexas.edu
(Prince is out of the country. To schedule an interview, please call Susan Binford at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at 512-415-4820.)

The recent recipient of a lifetime achievement award from the American Psychology Association's Military Psychology Society, in part for his research into Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Prince holds a Ph.D. in psychology from The University of Texas at Austin and the rank of brigadier generalĀ  (ret.) in the United States Army.

Suicide terrorism

Ami Pedahzur
Associate Professor, Department of Government
512-232-1452
512-363-6387 (cell)
pedahzur@austin.utexas.edu

Pedahzur is an expert on terrorism, counterterrorism and political extremism. With witnesses saying Maj. Hasan shouted "God is great" in Arabic before he began shooting, Pedahzur can provide context on how the incident relates to suicide terrorism.

The Fort Hood community

Ken MacLeish
Graduate student, Anthropology
512-964-4661 (cell)
K_mac@mail.utexas.edu

MacLeish recently completed a yearlong field project in which he lived in Killeen and immersed himself in the Fort Hood community. He is working on a dissertation on how the war in Iraq and violence affects the local community in its everyday life.

Stress and mental health professionals

Christopher McCarthy
Professor and Counseling Psychology Program Director, Department of Educational Psychology, College of Education
512-471-0368
512-825-3768 (cell)
chris.mccarthy@mail.utexas.edu

McCarthy has studied how mental health professionals cope with stress. Specifically, by examining the demands such professionals experience and their resources for coping, he has sought to better understand what factors lead to professional stress and burnout. His research also investigates the stress and coping processes of younger individuals and diverse populations.

War and violence throughout history

Thomas Palaima, Ph.D.
The Raymond F. Dickson Centennial Professor in Classics
512-471-5742
512-680-6623 (cell)
tpalaima@mail.utexas.edu

Palaima has spent decades researching war, violence and society from comparative and historical angles ranging from antiquity to present-day America. He recently authored an opinion piece on a new play about the impact of war.

Minorities in the Military

John Butler
The Gale Chair in Entrepreneurship and Small Business, Red McCombs School of Business; Director, Herb Kelleher Center for Entrepreneurship; Director, Institute for Innovation, Creativity and Capital (ICĀ²); Professor, Department of Sociology
512-656-9903 (cell)
john.butler@mccombs.utexas.edu

Butler has been a consultant for the U.S. military and many private firms. A sociologist and a business professor, he has studied race in the military and examined the economic and educational reasons people enter the military. A decorated Vietnam veteran, he is co-author of "All That We Can Be: Black Leadership and Racial Integration the Army Way."

How communities cope with tragedy

Ricardo Ainslie
Professor, Department of Educational Psychology
512-471-0364
rico.ainslie@mail.utexas.edu

Ainslie has done research on, and written books about, communities' responses to tragedy. He offered insights and expertise after tragedies like the Columbine shootings, epidemic of drug-related killings in Mexico and the racially motivated murder of James Byrd in Jasper, Texas.

Kevin Stark
Professor, Department of Educational Psychology
512-471-0267
kevinstark@mail.utexas.edu

Stark is one of the top national experts on depression in youth and did the largest-ever study on intervention and treatment for girls. He was called upon by New York City and New Orleans to develop procedures for dealing with youth after 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. His depression treatment program has been adopted by Belgium and the Netherlands as the only state-approved procedure for depression in youth.

Mary Steinhardt
Professor, Department of Kinesiology and Health Education
512-232-3535
msteinhardt@mail.utexas.edu

Steinhardt is a nationally recognized expert on resilience and has done studies on response to stress and anxiety with Dell employees, college students, people suffering from diabetes and families at Fort Hood.

Aaron Rochlen
Associate Professor, Department of Educational Psychology
512-471-0361
aaron.rochlen@mail.utexas.edu

Rochlen is the preeminent national researcher on men's emotional health and has done one of the only scientific studies on stay-at-home dads as well as one of the few studies on how men process, manifest and handle depression.

For more information, contact: Gary Susswein, Office of the President, 512-471-4945.

1 Comment to "Experts Available to Discuss Fort Hood Tragedy"

1.  William R. Taylor, M.D. said on Nov. 9, 2009

Condolences to all concerned in these extremely difficult times. Although not all suicidal or homicidal individuals are depressed, many are.
For anyone concerned about the risk of suicide or other risks, a variety of screening quizzes are available. For example, in the case of depression: see the Beck Depression Inventory, in David Burns' book, Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy.
Stress over time can trigger depression. Resilience is one term used to describe the ability to cope with stress and eventually get back to one's usual ability to function.
Parents, spouses, school staff, students or others interested in resilience might look at the free chapter on resilience at
http://stressedfamily.blogspot.com/2009/08/stressed-family-strong-family-chapter-1.html
or one on vicious cycles in families, such as nagging/procrastinating at
http://stressedfamily.blogspot.com/2009/10/how-to-stop-nagging-blaming-and-other.html