Kahlo’s “Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird” Extended to March 21 at the Harry Ransom Center

Dec. 16, 2009

Frida Kahlo's Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird
Frida Kahlo (Mexican, 1907-1954). "Self Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird," 1940. Oil on canvas, 61.25 cm x 47 cm

Event: The Ransom Center's display of Frida Kahlo's "Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird" will now be extended through March 21.

When: Through March 21.

Where: Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin, 21st and Guadalupe streets. Admission is free.

Background: The Harry Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin, is extending its display of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo's "Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird" (1940).

The display, which was originally to close Jan. 3, has been extended in conjunction with the spring exhibition "¡Viva! Mexico's Independence," which runs from Feb. 9 through Aug. 1, 2010. The year 2010 marks the 200th anniversary of Mexico's independence from Spain and the 100th anniversary of the Mexican Revolution, pivotal events in Mexico's struggle for self-governance. In collaboration with the university's Graduate Studies program and the Consulado General de México en Austin, the Ransom Center will display original materials from its collections that illuminate these historic touchstones.

Since 1990 the Kahlo painting has been on almost continuous loan, featured in exhibitions in more than 25 museums in the United States and around the world, in countries such as Australia, Canada, France and Spain.

After its display at the Ransom Center, Kahlo's self-portrait will be on view in Berlin and Vienna.

Watch a video documentary about the homecoming of this Kahlo painting, one of the Ransom Center's most famous and frequently borrowed works of art.

For more information, contact: Alicia Dietrich, Harry Huntt Ransom Humanities Research Center, 512 232 3667;  Jennifer Tisdale, Harry Huntt Ransom Humanities Research Center, 512-471-8949.