Spring Enrollment at The University of Texas at Austin Increases for Hispanic, Asian American, African American and Foreign Students

March 17, 2010

AUSTIN, Texas — Enrollment of Hispanic, Asian American, African American and foreign students at The University of Texas at Austin increased slightly in spring semester 2010 compared to the 2009 spring semester, the university's final report shows.

The most notable increases were among Hispanic and Asian American students.

Kristi D. Fisher, associate vice provost and director of the Office of Information Management and Analysis, said the report shows total enrollment for the 2010 spring semester is 48,167, an increase of 868 students (1.8 percent) over spring semester 2009. The total for 2010 includes 35,849 undergraduates, 11,100 graduate students and 1,218 Law School students.

The number of students, by ethnicity, includes: 25,662 white students, a 0.3 percent decrease from spring semester 2009; 198 American Indian students, a 0.5 percent increase; 2,146 African American students, a 2.6 percent increase; 7,483 Asian American students, a 4 percent increase; 7,781 Hispanic students, a 4.1 percent increase; and 4,360 foreign students, a 2.5 percent increase. The 537 students listed as unknown for spring semester 2010 reflects a 54.3 percent increase over the 348 students in spring semester 2009.

Fisher said proportional representation on campus for the spring 2010 semester, based on the final figures, includes: white students, 53.3 percent compared to 54.4 percent in spring semester 2009; American Indian students, 0.4 percent unchanged; African American students, 4.5 percent compared to 4.4 percent last year; Asian American students, 15.5 percent compared to 15.2 percent; Hispanic students, 16.2 percent compared to 15.8 percent; foreign students, 9.1 percent compared to 9.0 percent and unknown, 1.1 percent compared to 0.7 percent.

The proportional representation of undergraduate students by ethnicity includes: white students, 53.3 percent in spring semester 2010 compared to 54.6 last year; American Indian students, 0.4 percent unchanged; African American students, 4.9 percent compared to 4.8 percent last year; Asian American students, 18.3 percent compared to 17.8 percent; Hispanic students, 18.5 percent compared to 18 percent last year; foreign students, 4.2 percent compared to 4.1 percent and unknown, 0.5 percent compared to 0.2 percent.

Graduate (including special professional) student enrollment by ethnicity for spring semester 2010 includes: 6,556 white students (53.2 percent); 40 American Indian students (0.3 percent); 401 African American students (3.3 percent); 937 Asian American students (7.6 percent); 1,164 Hispanic students (9.4 percent); 2,848 foreign students (23.1 percent) and 372 students (3 percent) listed as unknown.

Total enrollment by gender includes 24,503 female and 23,664 male students. The enrollment by residency includes 38,838 Texas residents, 4,969 out-of-state students and 4,360 foreign students.

For more information, contact: Robert D. Meckel, Office of the President, 512 475 7847.

5 Comments to "Spring Enrollment at The University of Texas at Austin Increases for Hispanic, Asian American, African American and Foreign Students"

1.  Ivan Perez said on March 18, 2010

It's really cool that the exact statistical figures were posted here. It was so interesting to read the increases in UT Austin's enrollment. I'm Mexican and I'm quite surprised at the large amount of Hispanic growth in this university. I wish other schools posted these kinds of statistical data online.

Again, thanks!
Ivan Perez

2.  Manuel Garcia said on March 18, 2010

It would be interesting to know their intended fields of study.

3.  Dr. Francisco R. Pérez said on March 18, 2010

What do you mean by "white" students? Many Hispanic students are white. I believe that your nomenclature needs to be revised. I am Hispanic and I am white. You list by ethnicity but your division is not quite clear.

Thank you.

4.  leslie guzman said on Feb. 7, 2012

man i always wanted to go to this school and i finnally get to go in about 2-3 yrs and i think that this could change my life even more and this is one of the most important things in my life

5.  leslie guzman said on Feb. 7, 2012

i was wondering how i could become a teacher at this college so that way i can help the little ones here