Water Expert to Discuss Challenges of Meeting the Water Needs of Texas and the Southwest

Oct. 24, 2012

AUSTIN, Texas — Jay Famiglietti, expert in the global water cycle, will present "Last Call at the Oasis: Will There Be Enough Water for the 21st Century?"— part of the Hot Science-Cool Talks Outreach Series — from 7 to 8:15 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 26, in the Student Activities Center Auditorium (SAC 1.402). A pre-lecture fair starts at 5:45 p.m., featuring engaging activities in the SAC Foyer.

During the past two years, droughts have had dramatic effects on our lives through wildfires, water restrictions and rising food prices. What lies ahead for the 21st century Southwest's freshwater resources? How might climate change and population growth affect the way our water is replenished? Jay Famiglietti explores these questions for Texas and California using innovative satellite technology.

Famiglietti, director of the University of California Center for Hydrologic Modeling, is a featured scientist in the film Last Call at the Oasis, which was produced by the same company that produced An Inconvenient Truth. Famiglietti has a passion for, and commitment to, preserving Earth's environment for future generations. His research focuses on modeling and remote sensing of the terrestrial and global water cycles.

Discounted parking is available at the San Jacinto Garage.

Can't join us in person? Join our live webcast and ask Dr. Famiglietti questions in real-time! For more information about upcoming or past lectures, visit www.hotsciencecooltalks.org.

The Hot Science-Cool Talks Outreach Series is presented by the University of Texas at Austin's Environmental Science Institute. The series provides a means for leading researchers to share their scientific discoveries with the general public, K-12 science educators and their students. Lectures take place on the UT campus and are preceded by a science fair focused on the topic of the evening's presentation. K-12 educators participate in professional development workshops prior to each lecture and receive educational resources that enable them to give their own lesson on the lecture’s topic.

For more information, contact: Marc Airhart, College of Natural Sciences, 512 232 1066.