Tag Archive: biodiversity RSS

Shade Grown Coffee Shrinking as a Proportion of Global Coffee Production

Shade Grown Coffee Shrinking as a Proportion of Global Coffee Production

AUSTIN, Texas —The proportion of land used to cultivate shade grown coffee, relative to the total land area of coffee cultivation, has fallen by nearly 20 percent globally since 1996, according to a new study by scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions.

Crazy Ants Dominate Fire Ants By Neutralizing Their Venom

Crazy Ants Dominate Fire Ants By Neutralizing Their Venom

Invasive “crazy ants” are rapidly displacing fire ants in areas across the southeastern U.S. by secreting a compound that neutralizes fire ant venom, according to a University of Texas at Austin study published this week in the journal Science Express. It’s the first known example of an insect with the ability to detoxify another insect’s venom.

Grasshopper Mice Are Numb to the Pain of the Bark Scorpion Sting

Grasshopper Mice Are Numb to the Pain of the Bark Scorpion Sting

The painful, potentially deadly stings of bark scorpions are nothing more than a slight nuisance to grasshopper mice, which voraciously kill and consume their prey with ease. When stung, the mice briefly lick their paws and move in again for the kill.

Singing Mice Protect Their Turf With High-Pitched Tunes

Singing Mice Protect Their Turf With High-Pitched Tunes

Two species of tawny brown singing mice that live deep in the mountain cloud forests of Costa Rica and Panama set their boundaries by emitting high-pitched trills, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered. Although males of both the Alston's singing mouse (Scotinomys teguina) and Chiriqui singing mouse (S. xerampelinus sing to…   » Continue Reading

Bumblebees Do Best Where There Is Less Pavement and More Floral Diversity

Bumblebees Do Best Where There Is Less Pavement and More Floral Diversity

Landscapes with large amounts of paved roads and impervious construction have lower numbers of ground-nesting bumblebees, which are important native pollinators, a study from The University of Texas at Austin and the University of California, Berkeley shows.

Appalachian Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly A Hybrid Species Of Two Other Swallowtails, Scientists Find

Appalachian Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly A Hybrid Species Of Two Other Swallowtails, Scientists Find

Flitting among the cool slopes of the Appalachian Mountains is a tiger swallowtail butterfly species that evolved when two other species of swallowtails hybridized long ago, a rarity in the animal world, biologists from The University of Texas at Austin and Harvard University have found.

Experts for Earth Day: Researchers Offer Environmental Perspectives

Earth Day will be celebrated on Friday, April 22. Faculty experts from The University of Texas at Austin are available to discuss their research on topics ranging from the building of sustainable communities to plant ecology and environmental policies.

Think Globally, But Act Locally When Studying Plants, Animals, Global Warming, Researchers Advise

Think Globally, But Act Locally When Studying Plants, Animals, Global Warming, Researchers Advise

Global warming is clearly affecting plants and animals, but we should not try to tease apart the specific contribution of greenhouse gas driven climate change to extinctions or declines of species at local scales, biologists from The University of Texas at Austin advise.

Some species threatened by climate change could be moved to new ecosystems, says biologist

Some species threatened by climate change could be moved to new ecosystems, says biologist

Camille Parmesan's new, big idea in conservation biology—the "assisted colonization" of species threatened by climate change—is a product, in roughly equal parts, of cynicism, experience and hope. Parmesan, an associate professor of integrative biology, wasn't cynical at all when she first got involved, in the mid-1990s, with the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change…   » Continue Reading

Scientists Identify Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park As One of Most Biodiverse Places on Earth

Scientists Identify Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park As One of Most Biodiverse Places on Earth

A team of scientists has documented that Yasuní National Park, in the core of the Ecuadorian Amazon, shatters world records for a wide array of plant and animal groups, from amphibians to trees to insects.