Tag Archive: cancer RSS

LIVESTRONG Foundation Gift to Dell Medical School Allows UT Austin to Surpass $3 Billion Campaign Goal

LIVESTRONG Foundation Gift to Dell Medical School Allows UT Austin to Surpass $3 Billion Campaign Goal

With a $50 million gift from the LIVESTRONG Foundation to the Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin has exceeded its goal of raising $3 billion during the eight-year Campaign for Texas.

NSAIDs Benefit Overweight Breast Cancer Patients, Study Finds

NSAIDs Benefit Overweight Breast Cancer Patients, Study Finds

Researchers have determined that postmenopausal overweight or obese breast cancer patients receiving hormone therapy as part of their treatment and who use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin or ibuprofen have significantly lower breast cancer recurrence rates and a sizable delay in time to cancer recurrence.

Synthetic Molecule Makes Cancer Self-Destruct

Synthetic Molecule Makes Cancer Self-Destruct

AUSTIN, Texas — Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have created a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells.  These synthetic ion transporters, described this week in the journal Nature Chemistry, confirm a two-decades-old hypothesis that could point the…   » Continue Reading

MEDIA ADVISORY: Computational Medicine Day explores supercomputing in medicine

EVENT: The university’s first Computational Medicine Day. WHEN: May 13, 2014. WHERE: The O’Donnell Building for Applied Computational Engineering and Sciences, Avaya Auditorium, 201 E. 24th St., Austin, Texas 78712. BACKGROUND: The Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) Committee on Computational Medicine (Professor Michael Sacks, chair) will host the invitational Computational Medicine Day in…   » Continue Reading

Ancient Enzymes Function like Nanopistons to Unwind RNA

The research found that DEAD-box proteins, which are ancient enzymes found in all forms of life, function as recycling “nanopistons.”

Common Antifungal Drug Decreases Tumor Growth and Shows Promise as Cancer Therapy

Common Antifungal Drug Decreases Tumor Growth and Shows Promise as Cancer Therapy

An inexpensive antifungal drug, thiabendazole, slows tumor growth and shows promise as a chemotherapy for cancer. Scientists in the College of Natural Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin made this discovery by exploiting the evolutionary relatedness of yeast, frogs, mice and humans.

Teen, Mentor Work Together to Discover a New Treatment for Ovarian Cancer

Event: The Austin Forum on Science, Technology & Society will host "Teen Researcher: Discovering A New Treatment for Ovarian Cancer" presented by Google Global Science Fair grand prize winner Shree Bose and Dr. Alakananda Basu, professor of molecular biology and immunology and graduate adviser of the cancer biology program at the University of North Texas…   » Continue Reading

Nano-Sized Protein Clusters Address Major Challenge of Drug Delivery

Nano-Sized Protein Clusters Address Major Challenge of Drug Delivery

A new form of proteins discovered by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin could drastically improve treatments for cancer and other diseases, as well as overcome some of the largest challenges in therapeutics: delivering drugs to patients safely, easily and more effectively.

Researchers Suggest a Proximate Cause of Cancer

Researchers Suggest a Proximate Cause of Cancer

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin’s Department of Chemical Engineering are the first to show that mechanical property changes in cells may be responsible for cancer progression — a discovery that could pave the way for new approaches to predict, treat and prevent cancer.

New Round of Cancer Research Grants Attracts Rising Young Researcher to The University of Texas at Austin Faculty

With a $2 million startup grant from the Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT), biologist Jason Upton will join the faculty of The University of Texas at Austin in January to continue his efforts to improve existing cancer therapies and develop new ones.