Tag Archive: geology RSS

Massive Geographic Change May Have Triggered Explosion of Animal Life

Massive Geographic Change May Have Triggered Explosion of Animal Life

AUSTIN, Texas — A paper by Ian Dalziel of The University of Texas at Austin’s Jackson School of Geosciences, published in the November issue of Geology, a journal of the Geological Society of America, suggests a major tectonic event may have triggered the rise in sea level and other environmental changes that accompanied the apparent…   » Continue Reading

UT Austin Scientists Will Assess Health of New York-Long Island Barrier Protection in Wake of Sandy

UT Austin Scientists Will Assess Health of New York-Long Island Barrier Protection in Wake of Sandy

A rapid response science team from the University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics will help map the impact of Hurricane Sandy on the beach/barrier systems off the south shore of Long Island.

Study Will Assess Potential for Developing Country’s Fastest Growing Energy Resource

With a $1.5 million grant from the Sloan Foundation, a team of energy scientists, engineers and economists at The University of Texas at Austin will conduct the first detailed, comprehensive assessment of the country's fastest growing major source of energy, natural gas from shale formations, or shale gas, likely to be one of the country's…   » Continue Reading

Ransom Center Receives $10,000 Grant To Catalog Collection of Science Materials

Ransom Center Receives $10,000 Grant To Catalog Collection of Science Materials

The Harry Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin, has received a $10,000 grant from the Friends of the Center for History of Physics at the American Institute of Physics to rehouse and rearrange its holdings of the Herschel family papers and to create an online finding…   » Continue Reading

Geoscientists and engineers help Haiti prepare for the next big earthquake

Geoscientists and engineers help Haiti prepare for the next big earthquake

Within weeks of the Haiti earthquake last January, five geoscientists and two engineers from The University of Texas at Austin traveled to the island nation to help assess the damage, identify future earthquake hazards, and make recommendations about how and where to rebuild. They surveyed Haiti from the air, land, coastline and sea.

Geologist among team of scientists exploring how to work with robots on lunar expeditions

Geologist among team of scientists exploring how to work with robots on lunar expeditions

Mark Helper looked out the windshield of his pressurized lunar rover at a gray otherworldly landscape that stretched in every direction as far as he could see. With time running short, he and his teammate drove on across the rubble-strewn floor of a vast impact crater. They stopped and Helper used the vehicle's robotic arm…   » Continue Reading

Experts Reaffirm Asteroid Impact Caused Mass Extinction

Experts Reaffirm Asteroid Impact Caused Mass Extinction

Responding to challenges to the hypothesis that an asteroid impact caused a mass extinction on Earth 65 million years ago, a panel of 41 scientists re-analyzed data and provided new evidence, concluding that an impact in Mexico was indeed the cause of the mass extinction.

Rapid Response Science Missions Assess Potential for Another Major Haiti Earthquake

To help assess the potential threat of more large earthquakes in Haiti and nearby areas, scientists at The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics are co-leading three expeditions to the country with colleagues from Purdue University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, the U.S. Geological Survey and five other institutions.

World-class Gem and Mineral Collection Goes Digital

An extraordinary collection of gems and minerals is now a click of the mouse away after students at The University of Texas at Austin's Jackson School of Geosciences digitally photographed more than 6,300 specimens and made them available on a new, fully searchable Web site.

Arctic River Deltas May Hold Clues to Future Global Climate

Scientists struggling to understand how Earth's climate will change in the next few decades have neglected a potential treasure trove of information—sediments deposited in the ocean by major Arctic rivers such as the Colville and Mackenzie rivers—according to geoscientists at The University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M University.